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The Ultimate LinkedIn Sales Guide with Daniel Disney

On this episode of the Salesman Podcast, Daniel Disney shares his social selling secrets through his new book “The Ultimate LinkedIn Sales Guide.”

You'll learn:

Featured on this episode:

Host - Will Barron
Founder of Salesman.org
Guest -
Author: The Ultimate LinkedIn Sales Guide

Resources:

Transcript

Will Barron:

This episode is brought to you from the Salesman.org HubSpot studio. Coming up on today’s episode of the Salesman Podcast.

 

Daniel Disney:

But the reality is, you’re not going to buy from someone you don’t like. You’re definitely not going to buy it from someone you don’t trust.

 

Daniel Disney:

But the impact it has on traditional sales is even bigger. So when you do make calls… Will, I did something very similar recently where I was approaching a CEO of a very large global company.

 

Daniel Disney:

SalesLoft as a company are now working with him to help support that continued personal brand growth. You see it with a lot of these micro influencers that have grown within these companies. They’re one of the best resources that companies have, where you get these creative people putting out content, and that is where the potential lies.

 

Will Barron:

Hello, Sales Nation. My name is Will Barron, and I’m the host of the Salesman podcast, world’s most downloaded B2B sales show. In today’s episode, we have the king of social selling, Daniel Disney. He’s my cohost on the Social Selling Show, which you can find [email protected] as well as this episode, the show notes, and a link to his brand new book, The Ultimate LinkedIn Sales Guide.

 

Will Barron:

We’re touching on the book. We’re touching on social selling. We’re touching on the future of just selling on the internet in general and a whole lot more. And so with that said, let’s jump right into it.

 

Will Barron:

Daniel, welcome to the Salesman podcast.

 

Daniel Disney:

Will, thank you so much for having me back.

 

Will Barron:

You’re more than welcome, sir. How many times have you been on the show now? Victor Antonio I think has had the most returns. You’re probably second on returns on this show, I think moving forward now.

 

Daniel Disney:

I think this is our third or fourth time, and obviously we’re recording the amazing Social Selling Show together. So we’re spending a lot of time together, Will. I’m really excited to be back with you today.

 

Will Barron:

Good stuff. Well, we’re going to touch on the book, the Ultimate LinkedIn Sales Guide, throughout the conversation. We’ll share with the audience where they can find that and more about yourself towards the end of the show. The title of this episode, we’ll stay true to that, Turning LinkedIn Into a Lead Sales and Revenue Generating Machine, that’s why I won’t dive into in this episode, Daniel.

 

People Buy From People They Know, Like, and Trust. Is the Concept Still Relevant in Today’s Selling Environment? · [01:53] 

 

Will Barron:

So with that, mate, one thing that you say in the book, about halfway through, I really wanted to pull out and to emphasise, because this might tee up the rest of the conversation, then. You say, quote, “There is one universal truth that we know in sales. People buy from people they know, like, and trust.”

 

Will Barron:

Now, we’ve all heard this, right? It’s a universal truth because it’s almost cliche at this point, and every sales person is taught it from the first step into sales training to their last day in a sales role. But, is this know, like, and trust, is it becoming in the internet age, the social selling age, is it becoming more or less important for salespeople?

 

“The reality is, you’re not going to buy from someone you don’t like. You’re definitely not going to buy from someone you don’t trust.” – Daniel Disney · [02:27] 

 

Daniel Disney:

I believe it’s becoming more important, Will. It’s interesting you say that it’s a universal truth. There are still quite a lot of people out there that are very anti that principle, that don’t believe that knowing, liking and trusting is a valuable part of sales. But the reality is you’re not going to buy from someone you don’t like. You’re definitely not going to buy from someone you don’t trust. And so these components are really important.

 

Daniel Disney:

Now what’s happening in sales and will continue to happen is the standards that are expected of salespeople is continuing to grow. The buyers are getting access to more and more information. The power shift is happening.

 

“With the rise of automation, AI, and all these other tools that are replacing a lot of the menial sales activities, the best thing you can do as a salesperson is show the value of you as a human being above all.” – Daniel Disney · [03:17]

 

Daniel Disney:

And so, salespeople need to level up. They need to dig deeper. And so, earning that credibility, building those deeper relationships is the only way salespeople can continue to survive. And even more so with the rise of automation, AI, and all these other tools that are replacing a lot of the menial sales activities. The best thing you can do as a salesperson is show the value of you as a human being above all.

 

Will Barron:

For sure. Well, these are the differentiators for salespeople against a marketing led AI selling operation, right? Because if a buyer can buy from your organisation without knowing you personally, then you don’t need to exist. As a sales person, you do not add any value if the buyer doesn’t need to know you to get a deal done. And I say you, but someone within the sales organisation. It doesn’t have to be you, depending on your territory and that side of things.

 

Will Barron:

The like element of it I flip back and forth on. If I didn’t like someone, but I knew they could provide a tonne of value for me. Then I’d still buy from them. But clearly, if I do like someone it’s going to be far easier for me to take risks, to beat the status quo, to move forward, to get people in my organisation to jump on board.

 

Will Barron:

If I’m trying to convince Barry down the hallway, who’s got the budget to buy Sarah’s product, and Sarah is a complete arsehole, it’s going to be more, more difficult for me to get Barry on board. Whereas, Sarah’s lovely. She’s awesome. She’s really helping me out. I’m going to be more than happy to introduce her to Barry to get these deals done. So I flip back and forth unlike. So I would buy from someone I didn’t like, but it makes it easier if you do.

 

Will Barron:

But trust has got to be the big one because I can’t trust… I’m buying from Amazon. I might trust that the product is probably going to arrive, but I can’t go and have a go at someone, ask a question, blame someone if it doesn’t because it’s just this big beast organisation. So I’d be far more likely to buy if I had a customer service rep or a sales person or something like that with a name that I could tie to my problems or my issues.

 

Why Trust is The Biggest Competitive Advantage For Salespeople · [04:54]

 

Will Barron:

So I feel like that is the biggest competitive advantage for salespeople. You can go into a company say, “Hey, you put all the risk on me. I’m going to help you for it. I’m going to help you for your buying process and you can trust me,” if they can trust you, “and you can trust me to solve these issues.”

 

Will Barron:

That’s got to be a competitive advantage in the marketplace where the market is trying to push us towards automation, not actually speaking to real people, and just spam.

 

Daniel Disney:

No, I completely agree. What’s interesting is the amount we’re willing to spend online without interacting with a human being. Because however many years ago, spending 10 pounds would have been really scary, doing that without talking to someone. Whereas now we’re willing to spend thousands of pounds without physically talking to, seeing, or having anyone there by our side.

 

Daniel Disney:

And that’s only going to continue to grow, which obviously as we go into B2B, those larger deal size products, there may be a time in the near future where they become a lot more transactional and a lot less consultative. But at the same time, products, prices, deal sizes are increasing as well. And so the need for people is still very much going to be there and the value of you as a person. I completely agree like is probably the more looser term within it, but certainly trust.

 

Daniel Disney:

Where it becomes more relevant is the long-term relationship factor, renewals. When we talk about recurring revenue and trying to get referrals, you’re not going to give a referral to someone you don’t like. So those relationships, that whole like, know, and trust really helps cement long-term relationships, which should be the goal for most professional salespeople in the long day.

 

Will Barron:

For sure. And tying this back to social selling, this is why I think salespeople have this incredible advantage, right? I can’t remember who posted. Maybe you saw it, but there was a post on LinkedIn yesterday by someone that we hang around with virtually. And it was going through the number of posts that LinkedIn corporate made each month. It was like 30. Was it you posted this?

 

Daniel Disney:

No, no, but I know who did.

 

Will Barron:

Feel free to shout them out. And if you don’t shout them out, I’m going to assume that you hate them. But then it was like the number of corporate posts from LinkedIn is like 25, and the number of posts from LinkedIn employees was like 2000. The number of posts from Amazon corporate, 27. Number of posts from Amazon individuals on LinkedIn, people in the organisation, 2000. There was like thousands and thousands.

 

How Salespeople Can Use Social Media to Build Trust at Scale · [07:15] 

 

Will Barron:

So this is your competitive advantage because essentially you’re competing against, in some of these organisations, your own marketing team to justify your position, to justify the hopefully insane commissions that you’re making. And so pulling this about to know, like, and trust, into social selling. Social media is clearly the best way to build what we call trust at scale.

 

Will Barron:

We’ve just closed a high five figure consulting and training deal over at Salesman.org. I spoke to the VP of marketing at this company once, one phone call just to get the contracts aligned because they wanted us to sign their contracts as opposed to us give them the standard contracts.

 

Will Barron:

This would never have happened 20 years ago. This VP of marketing has been through all our content, listens to the show, is probably listening to the show right now as we record this, and has gone back and forth in our community. So they bought the product that we have for individuals, been in the community, saw all this, communicated with me in there, and then closed this high five figure training deal and consulting deal on the back of one phone call.

 

Will Barron:

That is incredible, right? That couldn’t have happened before social media, and it’s all because of this know, like, and trust, not just thrown out at one person on a cold call, but at scale where multiple people can see and get involved with. That, to me, is super exciting.

 

Daniel Disney:

Oh, the impact social selling has on sales is massive. Not only can it become an inbound lead generation machine where you’re going to get inquiries coming through that otherwise you wouldn’t have got, but the impact it has on traditional sales is even bigger. So when you do make calls…

 

Daniel Disney:

Will, I did something very similar recently where I was approaching a CEO of a very large global company, and I did my usual send a customised connection request, had no interaction with them whatsoever. Their reply to my connection request after they accepted was, “Daniel, your reputation precedes you. Can’t wait to get to know you better.”

 

Daniel Disney:

Now, to have someone of the most senior leadership position in a company, the most influential person within the buying decision already know me in a positive way is huge, and it’s a huge advantage for salespeople. And as you say, a lot of companies are now pushing resources into their sales teams in terms of putting out content and building this trust.

 

Daniel Disney:

What was interesting, going back to the post you mentioned, it does highlight how some of the biggest companies are encouraging their individuals to share content. Well, I can almost guarantee you the majority of content those individuals are sharing, they’re just resharing the company blog. And I know because I work with some of those companies. They’re not using it necessarily the right way. They’re just regurgitating content.

 

Daniel Explains Why Companies Are Investing in Employees With Strong Personal Brands · [09:46]

 

Daniel Disney:

So volume of content is better than no content, but what we’re starting to see is a lot of these companies now open their eyes to thinking, okay, maybe we don’t need them to just reshare our stuff, but let’s start giving them a voice. Let’s start investing in their brands, their stories, because that’s where the sales magic really happens.

 

Will Barron:

That’s the difference, Daniel, between a hack like me that sees that post and goes, “That’s incredible,” and then someone who actually knows what they’re doing and is involved behind the scenes like yourself. Because I would never have even… That wouldn’t have pondered my mind that 2,000 bullshit posts is probably not as useful as 27 actual thought out marketing posts perhaps.

 

Daniel Disney:

I had an interesting conversation with a guy called Tom Boston who works at SalesLoft, and he’s been creating these amazing videos. He’s building an amazing personal brand. And we were talking about how SalesLoft as a company are now working with him to help support that continued personal brand growth.

 

Daniel Disney:

You see it with a lot of these micro influencers that are grown within these companies. They’re one of the best resources that companies have where you get these creative people putting out content, and that is where the potential lies. Not everyone’s going to be a social selling star. There are lots of ways you can use it on a more long-term basis, but when you get those people, these companies are now starting to realise their value and use them as an asset. Don’t look at it as a problem. Don’t look at it, oh, you’re wasting your time doing this. You need to bring them in, embrace it, and maximise the potential.

 

Will Barron:

For sure. I’ve talked about it on the show in the past. This has been a real bugbear for us. I’ll tell you why it’s less of an issue in a second, but it becomes an issue for me to talk about sales when I don’t have to sell anymore. Our marketing now drives more leads for the advertising, for the signups, for the training product, the consulting that we do, and there’s very minimal consulting. My time needs to be spent elsewhere. So it’s not difficult to sell that out each month or each quarter.

 

Will Barron:

But I don’t have to do any selling anymore. So it was a real bug bear for me. It was a real problem because how am I supposed to talk about sales if I’m not sending cold emails, if I’m not experimented with cold calls or seeing if they’re still effective anymore.

 

Will Barron:

And this became an issue for me two or three years ago. Now it’s solved because in our community over at Salesman.org, we give people tests in the community, and you have a thousand salespeople saying, “Hey, well, I tried this and it worked, it didn’t work,” and we feed that back into our own training and product and service.

 

How Salespeople Can Drive Sales Just By Creating Content Online · [12:13]

 

Will Barron:

But what I’ve built, which is just literally in a spare bedroom of a flat in Leeds, is a business turning over millions a year with no selling. And I’ve almost engineered out myself of the business by literally just having content online.

 

Will Barron:

So for a sales person like Tom Boston, there’s countless people there, especially in the SDR roles, that are really crushing it and creating killer content right now. They’re going to end up, whether they realise it or not, with a nice little business on their hands, similar to what I’m doing, by just creating content, sharing what works, sharing what doesn’t work, sharing experiments, sharing their life experiences as they go throughout their roles. And there’s going to be a sea of these individuals who are going to be crushing it without actually doing all our much work in the not too distant future. Is it fair to say that, Daniel?

 

Daniel Disney:

It is, and you know what I love most about this, Will? Because I was talking to a sales author, someone who worked in the industry for 30 plus years, really experienced, really knowledgeable. And they almost had a bit of a chip on their shoulder about these young salespeople coming in and giving their advice and people following them. They were questioning, “Why would you listen to someone with three years experience when you can listen to someone with 30 years?”

 

Daniel Disney:

There is a point, because some people do come up and they try and sprout like they know everything. What I like most about a lot of these people, Tom, the Sarah Braziers out there, they’re not going out trying to say they know everything. What they’re doing is sharing their journey, and that is so valuable because it connects with other SDRs.

 

Daniel Disney:

Yes, there are amazing sales experts and authors out there that really do know a lot of stuff. And you should listen to them as well, but there’s going to be no one more valuable than other people in your role selling right now in the current climate, not spouting stories from 20, 30 years ago, but telling you what is happening right now.

 

Daniel Disney:

In 2020, during a pandemic, how can you successfully sell? Well, the best people are going to be the ones on the front line doing that. And I like that social media and LinkedIn gives these people a voice. And how they’re able to leverage it, not just to help their fellow peers, but to then influence and generate sales opportunities as well.

 

Will Barron:

For sure. As I said, if I feel guilty, three or four years into this of not doing all that much selling because the content does it on its own, I’d almost feel corrupt having written books for 20 or 30 years, speaking on stage, and not have done any selling whatsoever.

 

Will Barron:

I said the only reason I don’t feel bad about this, the real reason I feel excited about it is because there’s 2000 people in the Salesman.org community, and we run these experiments. So I’ve got access to data from real salespeople that you’d have to be like a Gartner to get them out feedback that we get at regularly. Now I’m sure the scientific method that Gartner uses is lot more sophisticated than the shenanigans that we have in the Salesman.org community, but this is a problem. This is a real problem, and this is why I liked the book, Daniel.

 

Will Barron:

So you mentioned an anecdote of working, having to reply back from a CEO of a multi-million dollar company before. That’s you literally doing that. That’s in the book. I’ve not managed to get through the whole book quite yet because I only got a copy yesterday, but the that’s one of the examples in the book. It’s real.

 

Is There Any Value in Reading Sales Books? · [15:18] 

 

Will Barron:

Now, let me ask you this. I’m kind of going off topic slightly here, but I think this is an interesting conversation for the audience. They’ll enjoy this banter. Do you read sales books?

 

Daniel Disney:

I do.

 

Will Barron:

Do you get any value from sales books? And I don’t mean to drop anyone in it, but be as honest as you can.

 

Daniel Disney:

Yeah. So people watching this on YouTube will see there are a lot of sales books behind me. I have read the majority of these sales books. There are some amazing sales book that genuinely I read, I apply, and I get results. There are great ones out there. I would say that’s the minority.

 

Daniel Disney:

There are also a lot of sales books that are either regurgitating stuff that has been said and said time and time again, others that are really off the mark. Some are just so hard to read, Will, being completely honest. I’m not going to name any of them. There are some good ones out there, but unfortunately it’s a very heavily dominated space.

 

Daniel Goes Through How He Writes Actionable and Easy-to-Read Books · [16:15]

 

Will Barron:

Your book is incredibly easy to read. Now I’m assuming this is because you’ve produced and published so much content, whether it be the previous book and then just daily posts on LinkedIn. Have you had any training? Because this is traditionally published, which is awesome, did Wiley come along and coach you on some of the writing? Do you have a ghost writer? Not necessarily a ghost writer, but you have an editing process? How do you go about creating content for a book of LinkedIn process? How have you got so good at writing concisely?

 

Daniel Disney:

I think the point you’re making, Will, is that it is very simple, and that is because I’ve written it in a very simple way because that’s how I process. I’m not trying to write something that’s really intense or intellectual because that’s not me. I just want to break things down in the most easiest, simplest way so that people can read it and apply it and actually get results from it. ‘.

 

“Writing isn’t about proving my ability to write, it’s about proving my ability to help people on LinkedIn.” – Daniel Disney · [17:01] 

 

Daniel Disney:

This isn’t about proving my ability to write it’s about proving my ability to help people on LinkedIn. So I wrote the book. Wiley then helped connect me with an editing team that essentially you imagine it was like a lump of clay. They helped me sculpt it and just fine tune it. But beyond that, it was kept simple for the pure reason I want sales people to be able to use it. This isn’t about me being a writer or an author. This is about me creating a guide that can actually help.

 

Will Barron:

For sure. So Josh Braun is very good at this. I know you know Josh as well. He’s been on the podcast loads of times. I’ll include some of his previous episodes in the show notes of this episode over at Salesman.org.

 

Will Barron:

Now Josh used to be a primary school teacher, so he’s got that teaching background. That’s one of the ways I guess he uses more traditional teaching, learning design to be able to communicate effectively on LinkedIn. He’s doing really well on LinkedIn. He’s publishing some great content on there as well. And he’s got a training product, which I’ve not been through, but allegedly for my audience is very good.

 

Why You Need to Start Teaching Instead of Selling to Your Audience · [17:56] 

 

Will Barron:

So with that all said, is it just time? Is it just practise? Or should we be learning to become better at selling? Should we be learning how to teach? Should we be reading books on communication? Should we be reading and leveraging resources that are not sales specific to become better at communicating value propositions and things like this to our audience?

 

Daniel Disney:

I could not agree with you more, Will, and it goes beyond using social selling. These are the skills that you need on the phone, through video communication, in face-to-face. You need to be able to convey a message, and there is a big difference between teaching and helping someone learn.

 

“It’s easy to tell someone about something. That doesn’t mean they process that information and understand it. Helping someone understand something is a different skill set. And that’s where simplicity comes in.” – Daniel Disney · [18:34]

 

Daniel Disney:

It’s easy to tell someone about something. That doesn’t mean they process that information and understand it. Helping someone understand something is a different skill set. And that’s where simplicity comes in.

 

Daniel Disney:

Will, I could use a load of buzzwords and sound really smart about LinkedIn, but it doesn’t mean you’re going to understand or learn anything from that, and that’s not going to make me look any better. I will look better if I can break it down in a way that you’re able to then interpret it and utilise it yourself.

 

Daniel Disney:

That is a skill, and I love that that sort of school experience helps. I have kids. I’ve worked in sales for a long time, and there are lots of things that helped me in my ability to help deliver an outcome. I think that’s probably the biggest tip, is to be outcome orientated, not just about delivering a message. It’s not because you’ve said. It’s, did they understand it?

 

Why Should People Listen to You? · [19:23]

 

Will Barron:

For sure. People shouldn’t listen because you have done this, done that, you are a legend in the space. They should listen because it’s effective. Is that fair to say?

 

“You can read all these wonderful books. It doesn’t mean you’re going to be able to apply anything afterward.” – Daniel Disney · [19:42] 

 

Daniel Disney:

100%. they should listen because it’s relevant, it’s current, and it can actually help you deliver a result. You can read all these wonderful books. It doesn’t mean you’re going to be able to apply anything afterwards. Look for the ones that genuinely are helping people, and there are some great ones out there.

 

How to Motivate Your Coaching Clients To Take Action · [19:47]

 

Will Barron:

What do you do, Daniel, when you someone’s read your book, and they put you in for some training. They know what they should be doing, and then you go on their LinkedIn profile because it clicks. It’s public. You’ve probably connected with them, and they haven’t done anything. What do you do to motivate?

 

Will Barron:

And this is relevant for salespeople who explain the steps to getting the deal done, explain the steps to solving a customer’s problem, but they find that the buyer then sticks with the status quo. They don’t make the changes. We talk about, risk aversion, all this kind of stuff, perhaps. But how do you motivate someone to take that bit of action towards something that they probably know they should be doing?

 

Daniel Disney:

There’s a few things. This is where coaching comes in, Will, but there are three types of people. There are the ones that read the book, that do the course, and that are self motivated, and they’ll go out and do it.

 

Daniel Disney:

Then you get people at the other end of the spectrum that just have no interest. They’ll flick through the book. They’ll half listen to what you’re saying, but they don’t care. They just want to keep doing what they’re doing. They’re never invested in an outcome.

 

Daniel Disney:

And you get the people in the middle that are really interested, but easily distracted, find it difficult to apply. And that’s where coaching comes into it. So if they haven’t done it within a week, giving them a nudge. If they’re struggling, maybe booking in some time and doing it with them.

 

Daniel Disney:

Now, this is something that is usually done between either me as the trainer or the sales leader, the manager, the director, whatever it may be. But a lot of it comes down to the motivation. And that’s why a big part of the book and when I train and speak is to inspire people to want to do it, to whet their appetite, to show them how much they can generate from it so that they have that inspiration or motivation to actually go and apply these things.

 

“It’s one thing to teach them how to do it, you need to get them excited about it as well.” – Daniel Disney · [21:20] 

 

Daniel Disney:

It’s not just one thing to teach them how to do it. You need to get them excited about it as well.

 

Lead by Example and Inspire Motivation in Your Clients · [21:24]

 

Will Barron:

For sure. How much of this is leading by example? And what I mean by that is you go, “Hey, look, all this business we’re doing, and look at these followers I’ve got, and I’m only doing what I’m telling you to do every day. I’m just a few years ahead of yourself.” How much of not leadership, but how much motivation just comes from leading by example?

 

Daniel Disney:

I think quite a lot of it, and that’s why I will always… And Will you’re in a very good position to have all your business come through inbound, but it’s really good that you’re using your community to still gain those insights.

 

Daniel Disney:

I get a lot of my business through inbound as well, but I will always be outbound selling to make sure that I’m trialling, using, modifying everything so that I am as current as can be. I don’t want to be teaching things that worked on LinkedIn five years ago because I guarantee you they’re not going to be relevant for much longer. So leading by example is such a big thing. Whether you are a trainer, an author, a speaker, even if you’re a sales leader, you need to be able to relate to them around what’s happening right now.

 

Sell More Using Customer Success Stories · [22:21] 

 

Will Barron:

So tie this back to selling. Salespeople I feel don’t use enough. And again, we’ve done these experiments in the Salesman.org community of leading with customer success stories as opposed to leading with our product does X, Y, Z.

 

Will Barron:

If you start your conversations with, we’ve had one of your competitors, we’ve had someone from a similar industry, someone that the buyer can relate to go through the steps…

 

Will Barron:

I’m not the hero here. I’m just the guide. I’m just the person who’s noticed them in the right direction. The customer is the hero, or the previous customer. They’ve been through these steps. We’ve found that whatever it’s called emails, cold calls, outreach, middle of the funnel, nudging to get people back on track, these customer success stories, they’ve been absolutely killer.

 

Will Barron:

And this all comes back down to leading by example. I feel like this is something that is under utilised by salespeople. I don’t know whether it’s… Is it ego? Do salespeople, myself, are our ego is too big to let other people, the other customers that we’ve helped be the star, the hero of the story here?

 

Daniel Disney:

Will, I was literally just about to say [crosstalk [00:23:27] It boils down to the ego of the salesperson, the trainer, the author, and I am very aware and passionate about not letting ego influence any part of what I do. I’ve had that when I worked in sales, I had it when I was a sales leader, and I’ll continue to have it in everything I do now. I think it’s so important.

 

“It’s not about you. It’s about them. It doesn’t matter how great your product is. It doesn’t matter how good your company is or how well known your company is. It’s what you can do for them as an individual” – Daniel Disney · [23:46] 

 

Daniel Disney:

It’s not about you. It’s about them. It doesn’t matter how great your product is. It doesn’t matter how good your company is or how well known your company is. It’s what you can do for them as an individual, and that’s why the focus will always be them.

 

“As a leader, it’s not about how good of a leader you are. It’s how much you can get out of your team and how much you can make them succeed. Their success is your success. As a salesperson, your customer success is your success. Ego shouldn’t play a part in it.” – Daniel Disney · [23:57] 

 

Daniel Disney:

As a leader, it’s not about how good of a leader you are. It’s how much you can get out of your team and how much you can make them succeed. Their success is your success. As a salesperson, your customer success is your success. Ego shouldn’t play a part in it. And that’s a big part.

 

“Understanding how to manage your ego is a subject that often isn’t trained, but it’s very valuable.” – Daniel Disney · [24:15]

 

Daniel Disney:

And again, going back to other subjects that can help salespeople, understanding how to manage your ego is a subject that often isn’t trained, but it’s very valuable.

 

Daniel’s Advise to His Younger Self on Selling on LinkedIn · [24:20]

 

Will Barron:

For sure. So we’ll wrap up the conversation with this one question, Daniel. If you could go back in time to the day that you signed up for LinkedIn, and you could tell that younger…

 

Will Barron:

I was just about to rail on you there because we know each other from other shows that we do, Social Selling Show. I was just about to say, when you could speak to that younger, less wrinkly, more youthful, more energetic Daniel. Then I was just like, I don’t really know Daniel all that well to stay the pis out of him on the show, but I’ve done it now.

 

Will Barron:

If you go back to your younger self, Daniel, that day that you signed up on LinkedIn, what’s the one thing that you’d tell him? If you could offer just one piece of advice to that individual at that moment in time, what’s the one thing that you would tell him?

 

“Focus on a niche. Try and find something that’s unique about you.” – Daniel Disney · [25:17] 

 

Daniel Disney:

I would probably tell him to focus more on finding the niche. It took me a few years to really focus on the LinkedIn social selling piece. I went into the more broader space over the first few years. And that would be the advice I’d give. Focus on a niche. And that’s the advice I give to people now. Try and find something that’s unique about you. Try and find something that people can associate with you as an individual. Had I done that from day one, I could have been even further today, but no regrets or anything like that. That’d be the advice I’d give.

 

Daniel Introduces His Book: ‘The Ultimate LinkedIn Sales Guide’ · [25:30] 

 

Will Barron:

Amazing stuff. Well, Daniel, with that, tell us a little bit about the book, The Ultimate LinkedIn Sales Guide. I’ll read the full title, How to Use Digital and Social Selling to Turn LinkedIn Into a Lead Sales and Revenue Generating Machine. Daniel, tell us where we can find the book, and tell us a little bit more about the book itself as well.

 

Daniel Disney:

So the book is the most up-to-date comprehensive guide to LinkedIn for salespeople. It covers everything from your profile using searches, growing networks, sending effective written, audio, video messages, creating engaging content, strategies, tools, processes, everything. It’s available on Amazon. It’s on hardback and Kindle. Audible will be coming soon. In the process of getting that out.

 

Daniel Disney:

And it just is everything I’ve used to generate a tonne of results from LinkedIn. And the goal for this book is to help salespeople, sales teams, companies around the world use LinkedIn better, in a more authentic way. This isn’t spray and pray. This isn’t spamming. This is about having real conversations with the right people that create real opportunities.

 

Will Barron:

Amazing stuff. The book is available on Amazon, and Daniel, where can we find out more about you as well?

 

Daniel Disney:

DanielDisney.online, or I’m on LinkedIn.

 

Will Barron:

Amazing stuff. And then, I’ll link to some episodes of the Social Selling Show as well. If you haven’t already checked that out, me and Daniel do a weekly show. How do we pitch it? I don’t think we’ve ever sat down and described what the description of the show is. I guess it’s social selling, internet selling, how how to close, find, and win deals via the internet. Is that fair to say?

 

Daniel Disney:

That is fair to say. We try and cover everything that’s relevant at the moment, the topics that are hot on LinkedIn, and the tips and tricks that are working right now.

 

Will Barron:

Amazing stuff. Well, I’ll link to everything we talked about, including the book, in the show notes of this episode over at Salesman.org. And with that, Daniel, legend, I appreciate you, mate. Thanks again for joining us on the Salesman podcast.

 

Daniel Disney:

See you soon.

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