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How To Refocus Your Sales Team (And 10x Their Performance)

On this episode of the Sales Leadership Show, Jarrod Glandt,  President of Grant Cardone Enterprises, explains how he leads his sales team, what he looks out for in new hires, and how to refocus people towards mega success.

You'll learn:

Featured on this episode:

Host - Will Barron
Founder of Salesman.org
Guest - Jarrod Glandt
President: Grant Cardone Enterprises

Resources:

Transcript

Will Barron:

Coming up on today’s episode of the Sales Leadership Show. I want to just start the show by asking you how is going into 2021?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

When I first started with Grant, the penetration of clients that we had in a particular industry was very high. And what I think the pandemic did was it exposed some people who were very reliant on very narrow client base.

 

Will Barron:

Give me kind of the stack, the technology stack that you use.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Yeah. So we don’t have a… Grant doesn’t… Until we get a check from them, we don’t talk about it, so. But we’ve got a database, a massive database, 1.9 million contacts.

 

Will Barron:

This is a slight, but it’s slightly more old school. You just have a team of individuals, or I guess, warm, semi cold calling people who are on their list.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

The new norm is cold emails, big list, find out who’s interested and then only call those people. But if we did that, we’d leave money on the table and we’re not willing to do that.

 

Will Barron:

Is there anything else that would be uncommon that you do look for?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

It sounds silly, but we want people that want to make money.

 

Will Barron:

Hello sales nation and welcome to today’s episode of the sales leadership show. My name is Will Barron, your host, and on today’s episode, we’re getting into it with Jarrod Glandt. Here’s the president of Grant Cardone Enterprises. On today’s episode, we’re looking at how you can refocus your team moving from 2020, which has been a mess for a lot of businesses and a lot of leaders moving into 2021, where there’s a tonne of new opportunity. Everything that we talk about is available in the show notes over to salesleadership.org. And with that, let’s jump right into it. Jarrod, welcome to the Sales Leadership Show.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Man, it’s great to be here with you Will again. Although this is a new show, I had such a great time with you last time we had the opportunity to do this together, so it’s good to be back.

 

The Evolution of Sales Leadership in 2021 Compared to Previous Years · [02:15] 

 

Will Barron:

I’m glad to have you back on. Okay. So Jarrod, no mess around here. We’ve just come out of, and you give me your thoughts and opinions on this in a second, but for a lot of businesses, a somewhat difficult or maybe extremely difficult. Yeah. Dependent if you’re selling anything to do with airliners or anything like that, right? And you’ve been at Grant Cardone Enterprises now over a decade, which is sick. Congratulations on that. I want to just start the show by asking you just very purposefully open-ended, how is going into 2021 in a leadership position different to all the other years that you’ve been kind of moving forward and pushing a team towards the goals in the past?

 

“And what I think the pandemic did was it exposed some people who were very reliant on a very narrow client base.” – Jarrod Glandt · [03:15] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Our businesses is a little bit different. And I think that this also provides a good kind of a gut check lesson for people. When I first started with Grant, the penetration of clients that we had in a particular industry was very high. And what happens is when something affects that industry, it affects you. And so there really isn’t a whole lot of insulation from things like this that happen, economic contractions, trade wars, et cetera, et cetera. And what I think the pandemic did was it exposed some people who were very reliant on a very narrow client base. And I mean, that is just the name of the game. If you work in the cruise business, that’s just your business. You have that one thing. As a sales person, if you’re selling into one industry, you will at some point be in a position where your industry is doing much worse than everybody else’s.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

And so there really isn’t a way around that for some people. But I think that if you are maybe an entrepreneur, a small business owner, you’re building a team, I think that those are kind of some of the things that you want to think about when you’re building out your product line is what type of insulation or protection do you have.When one industry is doing bad, where’s the yang to that? Where’s the uptick going to be? And I say all that because in our business we actually are coming off of a record year. We, by a long way, by 50%.

 

Will Barron:

Wow. Congrats.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

[crosstalk [00:04:18] So massive. And when you’re doing the type of revenue numbers we are, that’s a massive swing. And it’s because our client base represents every type of business you can imagine. And when some corporate customers were requesting billing modifications and pauses on their contracts or their billing or whatever, we had customers that were literally blowing our phones up going we’re out of control, busy. We need to hire people. We can’t train people fast enough. We need you to help get our sales team up to speed because we’re in a position where we were kind of just cruising along and then all of a sudden, wham. Their business just went off the hook. And so I got to see both sides of this. Businesses that unfortunately went under and then businesses that were absolutely crushing it despite everything.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

So preparing going in for me is different than most. For me it’s like, okay, well, how do we maintain everything that we did last year and then find ways to do more and find ways to do the things that we did better? For somebody who’s maybe coming out of the situation, the pandemic, in a worst spot, maybe your business has been decimated, you have to make decisions on how you pivot your business to serve your customers. Hopefully you do have customers and they have problems and needs that extend beyond your product or service. And you already have a relationship, you’ve already exchanged money with them. So you need to start thinking with how else you can serve your customers. For businesses that have…

 

“The AAR formula. And it’s just basically the three ways that you make money in business. You acquire customers, you ascend customers or you sell them more of your products, or you retain customers.” – Jarrod Glandt · [06:18] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

I did a podcast a few weeks, maybe a few months ago actually, about the AAR formula. And it’s just basically the three ways that you make money in business. You acquire customers, you ascend customers or you sell them more of your products, or you retain customers. So acquisition, ascension, and retention. Those are the three ways that you can monetize a customer. And for a lot of businesses, they need to start thinking with how they can retain their customers and what they can do to sell their existing customer base more stuff. They’ve already got the relationship. You just need to be more creative about how you leverage that moving into the coming year.

 

Jarrod Talks About The Psychology of Doubling Down on The Strategies That Are Working · [07:19] 

 

Will Barron:

So first off, congratulations. Absolutely sick that you’re crushing it and it’s great to hear a good news story, right? I know your numbers are probably at least 10x, they’re probably even 100x what we’re doing, but we’ve got a great year as well. And I think clearly we’re both aligned. We do a lot of online education and training and different things and your parts of your organisation kind of aligned with what we’re doing. So we’re ahead of the game. Clearly we’re in the right place at the right time with some of this stuff. But it’s great to hear that something’s going good. So let’s turn this on its head then. What are you doing to capitalise on what’s going good? For anyone else who’s having a bumpy year, what are you doing to double down on those things as a leader within the organisation?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Yeah, I mean, for us, what that really looks like, as much as we can grow and improve, we’re kind of at a matured point with our team where we have good training processes, good onboarding processes. We’ve got good recruiting, we’ve got a good employee track, ascension track. So when people come in, there’s a clearly mapped out and defined path for them to go from brand new SDR on the phone to senior sales person closer or a team leader. So for us, the opportunity is really just getting more people into the system and how do we grow the team because the demand is tremendous for the information that we have right now. And so for us, it’s we built a whole new team to mine the database. Outside of our corporate efforts that we have, our marketing efforts, sales efforts that we have, we built a team who really is going after our non subscription-based contract based training programmes, selling event tickets and different programmes and things of that nature.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

So it’s given us the opportunity to go well, we’re in a position where we can bring this team on. We have enough surplus right now where we can go negative for a few months while the team kind of gets their feet underneath them and figure out how to reach out to this new kind of group of our company. And that’ll be an eight figure division of the company by the end of 2021, based on the last four months of sales. So again, it’s just finding out where you can go a little bit deeper and we added a, actually an upsell to our corporate product. So again, all of our existing customers, we went back and we applied the same formula. Things started getting wild and crazy and businesses started failing. And we just said, okay, well, if it’s going to be harder to get new customers, what can we do to create something that adds more value for the existing customers that they’re willing to pay for?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

And so we created a coaching programme for our corporate sales training platform where rather than us giving you our online sales training platform with basic customer support, we brought on a team of coaches, we’re up to eight now, who basically have scheduled calls on a weekly basis and they deliver the training on behalf of the organisation. And so it goes down a little bit deeper into the relationship that we have with the customers and gives… We assume a little bit more responsibility for the way that the communication is delivered, the way that the training is delivered and then also how the team is actually applying it. So we just have a more active role with the customers and they pay us more for that.

 

Jarrod Talks About Their Massive Database With Over 1.9 Million Contacts · [10:30] 

 

Will Barron:

So tell me to get stuffed here, if there’s anything that is confidential that you don’t want to share, but when you say database, is this a CRM system? And if you can’t share, what CRM are you using, are you using any tools, any analytic tools? Give me the kind of the stack, the technology stack that you’re using here.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Yeah. So we don’t have a… Grant doesn’t, until we get a check from them, we don’t talk about it.

 

Will Barron:

Yeah. I got it.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

But we’ve got a database, a massive database. 1.9 million contacts and really the that we… We send a lot of emails. So we have customers that buy everything we sell but they do it on their own terms because they’ve unsubscribed from the list and they never see the promotion. So a way around that for us is to pick up the phone and make a call. It’s not the most efficient way. However, we have the scale and we have the product line. I had a guy on our team call in a $25 book lore. Somebody bought a $25 book. And the CSR team called, talked to the customer and sold him $100,000 coaching programme. So when you have the… And that just throws lifetime value off the charts when you go from selling $400 online course or $1,000 event ticket and you drop $100,000 coaching programme in there. It makes that work even better. And so again, for us, it’s just finding all of the cracks that customers are falling through that we’re missing and every business needs to get more scrappy right now.

 

“And in most cases, the challenging thing that people are going to have to come to terms with extremely fast is that depending on your business, it could be twice as hard or three times as hard to get the same amount of output that you were getting pre-pandemic.” – Jarrod Glandt · [12:19] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

And in most cases, the challenging thing that people are going to have to come to terms with extremely fast is that depending on your business, it could be twice as hard or three times as hard to get the same amount of output that you were getting pre-pandemic. And for a lot of people that’s really difficult because they’ve, for seven years, nine years, things were really good and really easy and everybody had money and people were confident and the economy was great, stock market was great. And then you get used to that. So it’s just a reeducation and it’s a couple of years of having to eat shit, if I can say that. You’re just going to have to roll your sleeves up and do some gritty work until things kind of start coming back.

 

Will Barron:

Sure.

 

“When the pie gets smaller, the people that are willing to bulldog their way through and get their slice, they’re the ones that always get fed.” – Jarrod Glandt · [13:16] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

But the hungry person always eats. The hungriest. The person who’s when the pie gets smaller, the people that are willing to bulldog their way through and get their slice, they’re the ones that always get fed.

 

How Jarrod and His Team Get The Most Out of The 1.9 Million Contacts in Their Database · [13:50] 

 

Will Barron:

Sure. How much of this is, because your database is clearly massive and there’ll be… We have a lot of enterprise sales people and sales leaders listening to this so they might have comparable databases. This is going to be a lot of small and medium sized organisations that are going holy shit, if I had a third of that, I could just sit on the phone all day and hit my own targets internally. So how do you go about, again, without talking about specifics, that’s fine, but do you use a lot of automation to ping up? For example, this individual is a CSO of a large organisation who’s looking for training, just happen to buy this book. And so we’ve got an aligning with them. Do you use automation for this or do you just have a massive team of individuals who are trained well enough to pick on some of the signals?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

I wish I could say that we had the most well-defined, well-oiled process that seamlessly moves people exactly into the bucket they need to be in. But we don’t. And that’s why we have to have another team that comes through and bats clean for us.

 

Will Barron:

And do they contact everyone Jarrod, or?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

They literally, I’m like, I want everybody in our database to receive a phone call. If we have a phone number for them, and they’ve spent a dollar with us, I want them to get a phone call from us. You may not get to them all this week, this month, this year, but the goal of that area is that every person who spent the dollar with us gets a phone call. And I think how we can email open rates. 10, 12%, whatever. I mean depending on how targeted the list is or whatever, but I mean, it’s just not what it used to be. So, but that doesn’t mean that there’s not opportunity there. That doesn’t mean that you can’t turn a $25 book sale into $100,000 transaction. But it just means that you’re going to have to work a little bit differently to get in front of them. And so we weren’t willing to sit back anymore and let people hang out on our list simply because they weren’t opening emails. And so we’re going to build a team and the team’s probably going to end up being 30 or 40 people. And that the purpose of that is to squeeze every last bit of juice out of the 1.9 million records that we have on file.

 

Doing Things in Scale: Why Grant Cardone Enterprises Target Everybody on Their List · [15:36] 

 

Will Barron:

So you talked earlier about this idea of a yin and yang and this is used often in investments. You have some super, really crazy risky investments and you have some super safe investments. Most people are playing in the middle and no, they don’t win. You win one way or the other. Are you treating your kind of prospecting machine like that in that you’re using a lot of… Clearly Grant and yourself, incredible marketers, you are meeting again attention. And this isn’t a slight, but it’s slightly more old school. You just have a team of individuals or I guess, warm, semi cold calling people who are on a list. That’s a massive way to differentiate yourself in the market because I don’t know anyone else who’s doing that at scale.

 

“The new norm is cold emails, big lists, find out who’s interested and then only call those people. But if we did that, we’d leave money on the table and we’re not willing to do that.” – Jarrod Glandt · [16:13] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Well, I mean, the traditional like the new norm is cold emails, big lists, find out who’s interested and then only call those people. But if we did that, we’d leave money on the table and we’re not willing to do that. We have the resources, we have the team. And again, it may not be the most efficient, but I want all the business. I don’t want some of the business. And so when you make a commitment like that to we want our programmes being consumed by 7 billion people on every continent in the world and we make decisions in the organisation based off of that. And so if that means that we have to build a team of 40 people to call low probability sales calls, we have the depth of product to know that if we monetize somebody, then we will do it again and again and again, and ascend them through to the point where it will maximise the revenue of the customer.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

And for us, again, we’re in a position, we’re of the mindset that if a customer has spent a dollar with us, they’ll spend another one. And just because they don’t answer an email or they don’t click an ad on Facebook or Instagram or an ad on YouTube or wherever, we spend seven figures a month advertising. I mean, we still promote our business. But when you use every resource, when you use all roads, then I believe that’s how we’ve been able to have the success that we’ve had.

 

How Jarrod and His Team Convince New SDRs to Buy Into The Strategy of Selling to Everyone · [17:45] 

 

Will Barron:

How would you go about, convincing is the wrong word, but how did you go about… Clearly you’re passionate about this and I imagine you and Grant a massively aligned on the strategy here. How’d you go about getting someone, I used the term SDR earlier on, an SDR bought into this process of we call everyone, we’re go in heads down, we’re going deep into this. How do you get them involved or I kind of bought into it? Or do they come to you having just such a massive brand and audience already bought into to all of this kind of high-level-

 

“If you can show somebody how to get what they want working for you, then they will do what you want them to do. As long as you connect the dots and show them the path.” – Jarrod Glandt · [19:01] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

I’d be lying if I didn’t say that there was a degree of that, because I think that people do just want to come work for us and be a part of the organisation. And in the absence of having that, then what do you do to keep somebody connected in and inspired and engaged? And that’s why what I talked about earlier is so important. A clearly defined roadmap with targets and benchmarks that need to be hit in order to show them how to ascend and then the revenue that’s attached to, or the income for them that’s attached to each of those marks. And we talk about personal goals, we talk about how to make sure that we show them a way for those goals to be realised working for us. And ultimately you don’t need to be Grant Cardone to show somebody exactly how to get what they want. And if you can show somebody how to get what they want working for you, then they will do what you want them to do. As long as you connect the dots and show them the path.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

And again, a lot of times that doesn’t happen. And so people end up working for will and going, man, this guy’s just driving me for these targets or these quotas or these numbers. And dude, I’m an employee. This is all I do is he just comes in and cracks the whip and I’m breaking my ass for this guy. And I’m not seeing any results from it. And then somebody else gets in their ear and they go why are you making calls? Why are you a salesperson? Why are you doing all that stuff? Man, the guy that owns the company, he’s the one that always makes the money. And then they start getting all this garbage in their head.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

When if you took an hour and just tried to figure out what was important to them and what they want to get out of life and what their ideal situation looks like and show them how they can make progress towards that by showing up every day and making this many calls and talking to this many customers and doing this many presentations and if you connect all those dots, then you eliminate a lot of the lack of clarity that they have. You give them purpose. You give them something to work for every day other than yourself, other than for the boss. They’re working for themselves and their goals. And when you can make that switch, then you have people that are driving for their own goals and at the same time they’re driving towards the company goals.

 

How to Maintain and Communicate a Winning Sales Culture · [20:30] 

 

Will Barron:

And what does it look like practically to do that? Is this because clearly you’ve got an incredible amount of online training contents that I’m assuming some of the team will go through. But is this sit down, as you alluded to that, is it sit down meetings once a month, once a quarter with yourself, the leadership team? How practically do you keep everyone on board and build that culture?

How practically do you keep everyone on board and build that culture?

 

“The athletes at the highest levels of their sport, you get them to perform the way that they do because they train more. They don’t train less. They’re not too good to train. They train more. They understand the value of refining their craft and repeating what seemingly mundane exercises.” – Jarrod Glandt · [21:27] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Yeah. Monthly one-on-ones and lots of communication, lots of training. No matter how long you’ve been here, we require everybody to train the same way. It’s probably about 45 minutes a day of training in the office, plus probably 20 that they’re required to do on their own at some point with our online programme. So we want them to be masters of the product and that requires that they use it. And then we train people really aggressively and that’s how we get people to perform. That’s how you get the people, the athletes at the highest levels of their sport, you get them to perform the way that they do because they train more. They don’t train less. They’re not too good to train. They train more. They understand the value of refining their craft and repeating what seemingly mundane exercises. Michael Jordan used to say that he would spend an hour warming up his ankles and his wrists before a game. Ankles and wrists. These are small little connect. He wasn’t shooting. Ankles and wrists, every game, he did the same thing.

 

“The people that perform at the top of their game, that is a trait that they all have in common. They’re constantly looking how they can be better. They have this competitive nature about how they perform.” – Jarrod Glant · [23:03] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

So it’s like people, I think ultimately lack the discipline to continue to do things that seem redundant to them. And they take them for granted. And I think that’s why people end up in this deal. They’re making 150,000 bucks a year or 200 grand a year and they’re like they get on easy street and they’re just stopping by, collecting a check, doing their deal. There’s not a lot of compression on them. They don’t compress themselves. They don’t put compression on themselves. And that could be the outcome that you’re looking for, but I guarantee you, the people that are knocking down seven figures a year in a sales role are not of that mindset. They are grinding. They’re trying to find the next deal. They’re trying to find a bigger deal. They’re constantly leaning in. They’re interested new things. The people that perform at the top of their game, that is a trait that they all have in common. They’re constantly looking how they can be better. They have this competitive nature about how they perform. And then they look at their peers and they look at people around them and that drives them and it pushes them to do more to where they…

 

“That doesn’t mean you have to have a million-dollar goal, but you have to figure out what’s important to you and you have to figure out a way to drive towards that every day. Otherwise, you will end up lacking purpose and lacking drive and lacking motivation and then you’re just going to be unhappy.” Jarrod Glandt · [24:10] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

You get guys on Wall Street that are working 18 hour days. I was reading about Mohamed El-Erian who runs… He’s the CEO of Allianz before that PIMCO. 2.2 trillion assets under management. This guy’s schedule was insane. I’m like, dude, how does this guy even live? He was sleeping like four hours a day. It’s insane, but they become obsessed with this pursuit of what they can… What they’re capable of, what their potential is. And again, that’s not a road for everybody to follow. I can tell you this, I’m never going to be in a situation where I’m only sleeping four hours because I got to get like at least seven hours of sleep. Otherwise it’s just no good for me. And so that doesn’t mean you have to have a million dollar goal, but you have to figure out what’s important to you and you have to figure out a way to drive towards that every day. Otherwise you will end up lacking purpose and lacking drive and lacking motivation and then you’re just going to be unhappy.

 

Will Barron:

Are you directly involved with hiring at the kind of SDR sales person level or you got kind of management below you?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Yeah.

 

Will Barron:

Cool.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Yeah.

 

What Jarrod Looks Out For in a New Sales Hire · [24:40] 

 

Will Barron:

And so in that case then, with yourself and the team, you mentioned you look at for sales people that competitive, I guess none of it is uncommon rates, competitive, disciplined, people are interested in improving themselves and learning. Is there anything else that would be uncommon that you do look for that you see I guess other people aren’t looking for in the market?

 

“It sounds silly, but we want people that want to make money. And you say, well, everybody wants to make money. Not everybody wants to make money.” – Jarrod Glandt · [24:54] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

It sounds silly, but we want people that want to make money. And you say, well, everybody wants to make money. Not everybody wants to make money. I want to know how much money somebody wants to make and not like, oh, I want to make a billion dollars. Not some half-cocked bullshit number that they’re just throwing out because it’s big. But we want people who understand what they really want and how much that actually costs. 

 

“So few people take the time to figure out what their ideal scene, their ideal life would look like and really get specific about what that looks like. Spend time in it, marinate in it, connect with it and then figure out how much it’s going to cost to live that life. And then back into production that needs to happen in order for you to hit those targets.” – Jarrod Glandt · [25:29]

 

Jarrod Glandt:

So few people take the time to figure out what their ideal scene, their ideal life would look like and really get specific about what that looks like. Spend time in it, marinate in it, connect with it and then figure out how much it’s going to cost to live that life. And then back into production that needs to happen in order for you to hit those targets.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

For me, I know I can be successful showing up and winging it. I’ve done really well for myself because I have the ability to think on my feet, but I know that I do better when I know exactly what I need to get done, exactly what the outcome needs to be and how that plays into the thing that I ultimately want to get in my ideal life, which is passive income targets, travel targets, family targets, community targets, health targets. I want to know how all of those things work together so that I don’t live my life winging it because I don’t know what the outcome of that is going to be. I don’t know what the destination is going to be. And maybe you like the unpredictability of that. I don’t. I want to know where I’m going and I want to be sure that I’m sold and I’m bought into that.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

And before you even really start talking about the next sales call, I think that people just need to spend some time figuring out what they want. It changes as you grow. It changes. I’ve got two kids now. I’ve got a three-year old and a five-month old it’s different now than it was three years ago when it was just my wife and I. It was different then than it was three years before that when I was a single guy working 12 hours a day, slamming phones, travelling, going out to see clients or doing… It’s just different. The things that you want change, the things that you value change and you need to spend time working through on a regular basis the thing that will make you happy. When you say 10 years from now, what does my ideal life look like? How much money is it going to take to live that life?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

I picked out cars, houses, travel, how much am I going to… I want to go to [inaudible [00:27:46] for a month, how much do I want to spend? I want to go to Mykonos for a month. How much is that going to cost? Where am I going to stay? Am I going to rent a house? When I’m here, I want to be able to go to California or I want to… How much does all that stuff cost? I want to be able to send a million dollars a year to charities that help kids in underserved areas. I know that those are all things that I want to do and I know that I have the ability to go out and do the thing that I need to do to get me the money that will be required to do that.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

But if I don’t know how many times I got to pick up this phone and make a call, how many calls to get an appointment? How many appointments to get a demo? How many demos to get a deal? And then what do I make per deal? And I can’t back all those numbers out and do that math out, then you’re kind of running at your target with a blindfold on hoping with your fingers crossed that you end up with a life that you look back and you go, oh, well, I lived a good life. I want to live a great life.

 

Why Winging It In Sales is Not Sustainable For Long-term Sales Success · [28:50]

 

Will Barron:

I’ve been in, use the word winging, I’ve been in that place as well and had success in a medical device sales and and other adventures as well. But whenever I’ve been winging it, it’s just been a lack of discipline from my perspective. And it might be that discipline because I don’t know what’s going on and it’s difficult to plan when you’re in a new role, starting a new organisation. You’re just getting into leadership, whatever it is. But I found it’s just been a complete lack of discipline and planning. And as soon as there’s a little bit of discipline and planning, I find it all becomes less, becomes more seamless and less stressful in an instant.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Yeah. Yeah. It just takes the guesswork out of it. You can try to make a meal that you saw in a restaurant or you had it at a restaurant and guess what ingredients and what amounts to put in, but if you have the recipe, you’re like dude, I got confidence. I know exactly what to do. It’s going to happen quicker. The meal is going to taste better and you’re going to get it right the first time. Rather than winging it and going well, I should have used more of this or didn’t use enough of that or I didn’t cook it long enough or I didn’t do this and you go through five or six or seven or eight iterations of it before you actually get the food coming out tasting the way you want it to. And writing your goals out and having lots of intentionality about that is the way to get the recipe and having that recipe gets you there faster, it gets you there with less stress. It does require discipline to follow the instructions and follow the directions and follow the recipe, but it ends up getting you what you want quicker.

 

How Sales Leaders Can Tell Whether The People They’re Interviewing are Intentional and Practical About Their Goals · [30:29]

 

Will Barron:

Yeah. For sure. And I’ll let you say this last point, this point practical Jarrod, if you’re sat in an interview, even if you sat at the back of the room and there’s a sales manager in there doing the talking, what are the top end and the low end, what would be red flags for you, for someone to say, I want to earn X amount. At what point do you go this person doesn’t really know what he wants or this person is probably not sensible in the head?

 

“We help re-educate people about money because the reality is 99% of people were not raised with wealthy parents in wealthy families with knowledge about how to become wealthy.” – Jarrod Glandt · [31:40] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Yeah. I mean, the number that they say is less important than the follow-up question, which is why. When they say I want to make 100 grand a year, I don’t want to hold that against them. Maybe they’ve been raised in an area where people just think small and they’ve never met anybody who’s made $4 million a year before. Who knows that 100 grand a year will be like? Okay, well, I mean, that’s good, you can live, but that’s not a lot of money. So you don’t hold that against them, but you talk to them about why. And then part of our job in this company is to reeducate people about money. That’s a product that we serve the public with is we help re-educate people about money because the reality is 99% of people were not raised with wealthy parents, in wealthy families, with knowledge about how to become wealthy.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

And most people would agree that money will not make you happy, but it will be better to have money than not have the money. Most people, most sane people will agree with that. And so then you just have to go through and have a little bit of re-education about what do we need to work on with this person when they’re here? Because when you say, they go, I want to make 150 grand. If I can make that, I’d be thrilled. Why do you want to do that? Well, because my dad has been in and out of the hospital for the last four years and his medical bills are… He’s got 50 grand in medical bill debt right now that he needs to get paid off. And I’d love to get a house here. When I can start… When I know that they’re starting to make a connection between the thing that they need and how much it costs and they have a true connection of that, then that’s a really good indicator. When people have no clear target, then that doesn’t necessarily disqualify them. It just helps us understand where we need to start with them.

 

“And I think that in an organisation your (as a sales leader) job is to help the people that are working with you or for you to do better. And a lot of times they have blocks that prevent that from happening.” – Jarrod Glandt · [33:16] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

And that’s not like… It’s not like oh, this is going to be a six month project with this person. But it’s just asking some questions that really get people to think and consider answers to questions that they haven’t really ever asked themselves before. And I think that in an organisation your job is to help the people that are working with you or for you to do better. And a lot of times they have blocks that prevent that from happening. And you can either be passive about it and not discuss these types of things or you can confront them and help people understand. People may not understand why you make cold calls. Well, if I can show you that you can make cold calls to a database of 1.9 million low probability call that you can make 180 grand a year, do I have your attention?

 

“You’ll spend more time with the people you work with and your family in most cases. And so you have to create an environment where people want to be there and they want to do well, they want to do great, not just for themselves, but also for you.” – Jarred Glandt · [34:51] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

And then I can show you a track where you can actually ascend up to becoming a sales leader or a top producing sales performer. And I can show you W2s for almost 600 grand a year from salespeople. Does that interest you? Then you can start kind of communicating to people in a different way. But again, I think it’s the responsibility of the leader to make people better. As people and in life and I think that’s, when you started investing in people like that, that’s how you really develop advocacy and that’s how you develop employees that they’ll work the extra hours. They’ll make the extra calls. They’ll take on the tough assignment because they know that you’re in it with them and that you care about them. And it’s really important for somebody that you’re going to be spending a lot of time with. You’ll spend more time with the people you work with and your family in most cases. And so you have to create an environment where people want to be there and they want to do well, they want to do great, not just for themselves, but also for you.

 

Why It’s The Sales Leader’s Job to Motivate and Inspire The Sales Team · [35:33]

 

Will Barron:

I think that’s an under pondered about point that, yeah, you definitely spend, especially if you’re in an office environment, way more time with the people. Jerry is sat next here and Sarah across the other side of the room. And maybe Sarah is a bit of an asshole, I don’t really like her, but I like Jerry. You spent so much time with these individuals that you’d be crazy not to, from a leadership perspective, add extra layers of value to your team to glue them together. And again, and we’ll wrap up in a second, Jarrod, but just on this, is this something that a sales leadership do? Or is this something that HR do with regards to documenting all of this and promoting the fact that there is a group opportunities within the organisation? Is this something you ask line managers?

 

Jarrod Glandt:

All of this stuff that I’ve been talking about is all a sales job. We’re out selling customers to do business with us. You got a sales job with your people every day, keeping them engaged, keeping them fired up. And that’s not a job HR can do. HR cannot do that job for us here. HR cannot go in and talk to somebody about making seven figures because the HR department ain’t got nobody in there making seven figures. And no sales person is gonna look at an HR and go, man, I want that life. They’re going to look at the top people in the company and they’re going to go those people are all selling and that’s what I want. I want that life. I want that money. I want that outcome. That’s what I’m here for. And so this is the job of the sales person and I consider myself the salesperson. I’m constantly selling people within the organisation to think bigger, to do what I did. I went from answering phones to being the president of the company, running a nine figure enterprise. It’s a massive success story. I’ve got my top sales guy right now, he’s done $6 million in sales this year. He started out answering phones and now he’s making 50 grand a month. These are the things that we want to show people and reinforce to people within the company to show them what’s possible.

 

The One Piece of Advise Jarrod Would Give To Brand New Sales Leaders · [37:05]

 

Will Barron:

Love it, love it. Okay. I’ve got one final question for you and we’ll wrap up with this. If you could speak to someone and you could offer them one piece of advice, a brand new sales leader, perhaps the 30 days and 60 days and 90 days into the new role, what would be that one piece of advice that you’d give them?

 

“Take the time to figure out what your people want, what goals that they have in their life. Take the time to show them how they can make that happen working for you. And keep them accountable to their goals because while you’re doing that, they will be accountable to your goals.” – Jarrod Glandt · [37:23] 

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Yeah, I would, like I was just talking about, take the time to figure out what your people want, what goals that they have in their life. Take the time to show them how they can make that happen working for you. And keep them accountable to their goals because while you’re doing that, they will be accountable to your goals.

 

Parting Thoughts · [37:43] 

 

Will Barron:

I love it. Love it. Well with that Jarrod, tell where we can find out more about you and then give us the picture of what Grant Cardone Enterprises can offer sales leaders as well.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

Yeah. You can find me everywhere on online @JarrodGlandt. I’m sure you’ll put that somewhere in the show. On Clubhouse, new app Clubhouse that we’ve been experimenting with over here. I don’t know if you are on the Clubhouse app yet, but it’s like an audio chat room, if that makes sense. A multi-line podcast with multiple hosts, all audio but it’s very interesting. Anyways, it’s tangent. Our company helps companies with sales people sell more product faster. We have training processes that we put in place that are delivered through an online platform, through virtual events, through live events. We helped develop the ability to sell to market, promote the business and then to scale. We have Cardone Ventures, which is our basically our scaling arm. We partner with companies there. We help leaders, business owners instal systems and processes in their business that will allow them to scale profitably and will allow them to basically set their company up for an exit depending on what that ultimate outcome is going to be.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

But the core DNA of what we have is we just want to make people better. We want to help them improve their communities, their families through selling more of the products and services that they represent. And so you can learn more about Grant at grantcardone.com. He is the visionary, the guide steering the ship here. cardoneuniversity.com is our online sales training platform. And then our big annual event, which is coming up this March, 12-14th here in Miami, the 10x growth conference. Top celebrities, top business experts in the world. Come last year, we had Kevin Hart, John Travolta, Dana White from the UFC, Floyd Mayweather, Magic Johnson and on and on and on. This year is going to be insane also. That’s 10xgrowthcon.com. Lots of shameless promotion in there. Thank you for the opportunity to do that. But most importantly, thank you for giving me the opportunity to have this chat with you. Missing the pint of course in the pub but I hope that this gave some folks some things to think with and gnaw for the year that ultimately helped them out.

 

Will Barron:

For sure. And I’ll link to all that in the show notes of this episode over at salesleadership.org. And with that Jarrod, you’ve given me a few things to gnaw on mate. I appreciate that. This will be chopped up into many little clips, I’m sure. And with that, man, I want to thank you for again joining us on the Sales Leadership Show.

 

Jarrod Glandt:

My pleasure. Thanks so much.

 

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