fbpx

How To Prospect On LinkedIn Using Video Messages

You'll learn:

On this episode, Daniel and Will talk about what everybody is raving about — How To Prospect On LinkedIn using video messages. We talk about how to use it, for what cases and why you should add this to your cold calling, written and audio messages while prospecting in Linkedin.

“Yeah, they are certainly not the be-all-and-end-all, as a lot of people are suggesting they’re not that one form of messaging to rule them all. There are as many people who hate getting video messages as there are who like getting them. They are a good critical, valuable source of messaging, but they are no more valuable than audio messages or written messages.” – Daniel Disney

Replacement For Face-to-Face

Receiving overly templated, spam messages is always easy to ignore. However, Will shares when he receives video messages in his inbox, he feels extra guilty ignoring it, as it seems like the sender went the extra mile. Daniel agrees and says that the key for successful video messages is to keep it personalized. Further, Daniel shares the importance of sending video messages, as an add on to your written and voice messages.

“Certainly in our current climate, it’s the best that we have face to face replacements. Video messages can and should be used at all parts of the sales process. So you can use video messages well for prospecting.” – Daniel Disney

Do Your Homework Before Prospecting On LinkedIn

Daniel advises salesmen to do your homework, as it is a crucial part of keeping the video messages personalized. A quick browse through the prospects Linkedin profile and personalized message on how your offer fits the prospects needs is the way to go. Aside from that, you can also determine if the prospect is a “hey” type of person or a “hi” type of person.

“Above all of it, Will, is, treat everyone individually. So don’t try and create a blanket approach that you use on everyone.” – Daniel Disney

Content and Hardware Needed

Daniel and Will both agree on going on the “soft approach” with video messaging. It’s a great way to introduce yourself, for the prospect to see the man/woman behind the messages. Daniel also advises to keep the CTAs (such as book a call with us) in your audio or written messages.

The duo also discussed the technical aspect of recording and sending video messages, from the messaging to the actual hardware needed for an effective video message.

“Let your sales team have the equipment they need to send good video messages. And if you are back in the office, or you’re going to be heading back in the office, I’ve seen a lot of companies now build video pods in the sales floor, having special areas where salespeople can record the messages with a good background, good lighting, etc.” – Daniel Disney

Social Selling Show Hosts:

  • Daniel Disney is the King of Social Selling, a best selling author and keynote speaker. Daniel is also the founder of The Daily Sales.
  • Will Barron is the founder of Salesman.org where he helps B2B sales professionals master modern sales in just 42 days.

Resources:

Transcript:

Will Barron:

Welcome to the Social Selling Show with, myself, Will Barron, and the king of social selling, the complete legend, Daniel Disney. Daniel, how’s it going, sir?

 

Daniel Disney:

It’s going very good, Will. Excited to be back. And a lot of fun just trying to pronounce the Social Selling… It is quite a mouthful isn’t it… Social Selling Show, Social Selling Show. Do it in a Sean Connery voice.

 

How to Send Video Messages on LinkedIn · [00:48]

 

Will Barron:

Yeah, I think I need just to drink more tea. I had a vocal coach on the Salesman podcast a couple of weeks ago and somebody said to me, “If you are slurring your words, it’s because you’ve not got enough liquid in your mouth, as opposed to you’ve got too much. Your mouth is producing too much saliva.” So from there, I’ve been trying to have more cups of tea next to me, very British of us as we go through these shows. Clearly, it’s not working very well when I can’t pronounce the name of the show, the Social Selling Show. And with that, we’re going to talk about video messages. Specifically, let’s call them specific on LinkedIn in this episode, because I feel like video messages over email it might be too big of a topic to cover in one go. With that Daniel, all LinkedIn messages, LinkedIn video messages the be-all and end-all that everyone seems to be raving about at the moment, or should they be used in specific use cases? I’ll give you my thoughts on this in a second.

 

Daniel Disney:

Yeah, they are certainly not the be-all and end-all as a lot of people are suggesting. They’re not the one form of messaging to rule them all. There are as many people who hate getting video messages as there are who like getting them. They are a good, credible, valuable source of messaging, but they are no more valuable than audio messages or written messages. So yes, as we will cover in this episode, they should be used, they work, but by no means put all your eggs in one basket, make sure you’re using it alongside, audio written… And then obviously things like cold calling, email and all the other methods of communication that exists.

 

The Social Pressure Behind LinkedIn Video messages · [01:53]

 

Will Barron:

Sure. I don’t know your experience with getting video messages over LinkedIn, and audio messages as well, but we’ll keep them separate, but I feel like they’re in the same kind of category here, in that when I get one, I feel guilty if I don’t reply. Now, this may not last very long if more and more people use them and they become more ubiquitous and every message you get is video or audio. But especially that very first message, if someone sends me a somewhat spammy text message, I’ll just ignore it. Or if it’s super spammy, I’ll just block them to get them out of my inbox. But a video message, I feel guilty. I feel like someone’s gone the extra mile. I feel like, ah, I’ve got to watch it now. They’re going to know if I’ve not watched it. I feel like there is an element of social pressure to consume that content, which is probably why maybe they work quite well.

 

Daniel Disney:

Yeah, I think the key probably to identify at the start is good video messages can drive that type of feeling, personalised ones. There are still a lot of salespeople that are sending generic, non-personalised video messages that don’t make me feel any more inclined to reply compared to any other form. So yes. Good, personalised ones where they’ve made an effort. Absolutely. It does encourage you to want to reply. And that is, again, why they’re working. But that personalization can be done in other means, as well. And then that’s kind of the core to success in any form of messaging on LinkedIn.

 

Will Barron:

Sure. And I like a video message, and I’ve sent… I’ve not sent tonnes, though. I’ve sent a few myself when I know the person. So I’m not using this to break ground. I want people to… I owe this slowly, slowly approach of a lot of the sales that we do, because we do larger enterprise sales, whether it’s sponsorships or training, I’m not necessarily saying to individuals on LinkedIn. So just to caveat what I’m saying here, I like to use a video message to reignite conversation. So someone’s gone a bit cold. I’ll send a video message to be like, “Hey, we’re just thinking about you,” or, “There’s this piece of content that I came across,” or whatever it is. Similar to what I do in an email, but over a video. I feel like it just has that… It pierces through that little bit more to reignite a sales conversation.

 

Expounding on The Slot Machine Principle · [04:01]

 

Will Barron:

And I also liked them as just, one-offs. Are you familiar with… I’ve got in the notes here, but this concept of the slot machine principle.

 

Daniel Disney:

No, I’m not aware of that.

 

Will Barron:

Okay. So it’s well-studied psychological principle, and Vegas and every pub in the UK with a slot machine in it is based upon this idea of you get little treats, little treats, then you get nothing, nothing, nothing, and then you get one big win. And if for a slot machine, for example, if you get one big win, once a trip to Vegas, or once every few weeks at the pub, that then spikes your dopamine. Serotonin, and then you want to go back to it, even though that one big win, for most people it might be 50 quid and you put 200 quid in there over the course of those few weeks. That one big win is important into keeping that addiction to whatever that you’re doing to keep going.

 

When to Send LinkedIn Video Messages to Sales Prospects · [05:12]

 

Will Barron:

And I feel like we can use video as a one big win within our cadence of communication. So if it’s text, text, phone call, whatever it is, just a nice video message is so it can come so out of the blue. And I like to do this with our good customers as well, just every now and again, send them a video message saying I was just thinking about you or I was remembering this or doing that. No need for a reply. I like to use it as a kind of slot machine jackpot principle. And so that’s my thoughts on it, Daniel. When do you think we should be using video messages? Is there something that comes throughout the sales cycles? Is it once, is it twice? How would you position this as a messaging vehicle?

 

“Receiving a good video message does make you feel good. And the beauty of it is you send a written message, they read your words, you send audio and they get to hear your voice. You send a video and they get to see you.” – Daniel Disney · [05:27]

 

Daniel Disney:

Well, I really like that example and you’re right. Receiving a good video message does make you feel good. And the beauty of it is you send a written message, they read your words, you send an audio and they get to hear your voice. You send a video and they get to see you. And you’re talking to them. It’s as if you’re there with them. And certainly in our current climate, it’s the best that we have to face-to-face replacements.

 

Daniel Disney:

Video messages can and should be used at all parts of the sales process. So you can use video messages as well for prospecting. So as a first message, you can successfully send good video messages that create sales opportunities. You could send them throughout the entire sales process from qualification, to presenting, to giving value-relationship building. You can utilise video messages to follow up on deals, to help increase velocity and closing. And then you can use videos for post-sale account management and continued relationship building. As you said, they are a great form of communicating a message. So it could be, “Hi, Will, just wanted to send you a quick video, loved your posts that you shared last week. Hope everything’s going well,” and then you could go on to whatever was relevant to the stage of the sales process that you’re in, but you can use it at any given point.

 

How not to prospect on Linked. Characteristics of  a Bad LinkedIn Video Message · [06:50]

 

Will Barron:

Sure. Do you have any… I want to talk about templates and how we can not necessarily bash out a thousand video messages in the morning, but a framework so that we’re not inadvertently creating bad video messages. But before we do that, is there any characteristics of a bad video message that we should be avoiding all costs?

 

Daniel Disney:

There are a lot. And I get and see a lot of terrible video messages on a frequent basis. I think we’ll cover a couple of them. From a template perspective, a lot of it comes more down to delivery and again, the personalization. So the ones that certainly stand out the most to me in a negative way are the ones that haven’t done their homework, that they haven’t actually gone and looked at my LinkedIn profile, looked at my LinkedIn activity, done any level of digging that gives them then something to bring to the table to show me why they genuinely think their product or service is relevant to me and valuable to me, that’s the sort of instant no-no, if you’re not doing those little tiny bits of efforts, then it’s going to be a lot less likely that the prospect is going to respond positively to your video.

 

Daniel Disney:

Then it’s more of the to the behind the scenes bits. So we’ll talk about things like background and lighting and stuff like that. But from a delivery perspective, it could be looking at the camera when you speak. It could be knowing what you’re going to say, avoiding too many ums and ums, which can often happen when you don’t know what you’re going to say, or you’re not fully confident in what you’re going to say. The other side of it is don’t read off a script. You don’t want someone recording a video and reading off the same words off of a line of paper where they’re reading it in the same monotonous… You want to have personality. So it’s all those little details that sew together to make a good video.

 

Will Barron:

It’s interesting because you are… I’m sure you’re aware of this because I’m sure you practise it. You’re very good at not using, I did it then, using filler words and… and… You’re very succinct with this… We’re just chatting here. I’m sure down the pub, after a few pints, there’ll be a few more filler words because clearly this is going out to tens of thousands of people, so we want to polish it the best we can whilst it still being a conversation.

 

Will Barron:

But you’re dead right in that there’s this vast differences between reading from a screen. I’ve seen people do it from a teleprompter. Now I’ve got a teleprompter in front of me here. It’s not turned on, obviously, as we chat, Daniel. But you can see people’s eyes go across like this. Or maybe it’s not teleprompter. Maybe there’s a big whiteboard or something in the background that they’re reading from. Well, that’s just as disingenuous and just frankly awkward as looking down at a screen and using a script.

 

Tips for Creating Personalized LinkedIn Video Messages · [09:45]

 

Will Barron:

So with that said, and I think I haven’t say this, some of this is common sense. Don’t do this when you’re hung over on a Tuesday morning, after a heavy night of drinking on a Monday night. Just put it off to the next day to make sure that you’re fresh and sprightly and you’re in a good mood. And don’t do it in the dark. Clearly, have decent lighting, and we’ll get onto the video aspects and audio and all that stuff in a second. But is there anything that we should include in most messages, for example, we should perhaps treat it conversational and say, “Hey, Daniel,” yada, yada, yada, as opposed to in more formal of “Hello, Daniel Disney,” and then go down that route. Is there anything that we should be not necessarily templates in our scripting, but that should happen in these voicemails? Or video calls, sorry.

 

Daniel Disney:

Above all of it, Will, is treat everyone individually. So don’t try and create a blanket approach that you use on everyone. So even down to the hey or the hi, treat it individually to the person. So if you go on their profile, if you look through their content and you see they’ve got quite a friendly tone of voice, they look like a hey-type person, then go with the hey. But I have tonnes of decision-makers that I’ll target that are more of a hi-type person that are more professional, that put out more professional content. You could see it in their profile and in their content and in their activity that actually a hi is going to work better. So you need to treat everyone individually and obviously, again, doing your homework is going to help you get a better understanding of the lay of the land.

 

“Do some homework. The best thing you can do above all is show them that you’ve made an effort, show them that you genuinely want to help.” – Daniel Disney · [11:02]

 

Daniel Disney:

So yeah, treat everyone… And, again, the cool thing through all of this is do some homework. Don’t go in there blind. If you do, that’s where you’re going to open doors to a lot of these traps that you want to try and avoid. Do some homework. The best thing you can do above all is show them that you’ve made an effort, show them that you genuinely want to help. But going back to the teleprompter thing. I’ve seen people have notes that they have to keep looking on and it shows that they don’t actually know, or they’ve not made any real effort. They’ve just jotted it down to prompt from there. Make it seem calm that you are confident, that you genuinely have that belief. So rehearse it, remember it and just go out there with the genuine belief that you can help, but do that homework first.

 

How to Subtly Insert a Call to Action in Your LinkedIn Video Message · [11:38]

 

Will Barron:

What are you’re thoughts with regards to the wrap-up of a video message? So from my perspective, I don’t think it’s the best platform to make asks. I think it’s much more succinct, conversational, and real when it’s, “Hey Daniel, this, this, and this. I thought this would be useful for you,” as opposed to, “Hey, Daniel, I’ve not heard from you for a week. Can you email me back, please?” Obviously, that’s a stark example there, but is it a method of communication that we should be including cult actions within, or should it be used in a more softly, softly approach, especially on LinkedIn?

 

“Video is really effective for prospecting and relationship building. But audio messages are certainly a lot more effective from a call to action and a follow-up type of format” – Daniel Disney · [12:17]

 

Daniel Disney:

No, I’m with you, Will. The softly, softly approach is certainly my personal favourite and the one that’s worked for me most. What I found personally is video is really effective for prospecting and relationship building. If you’re learning how to prospect on LinkedIn, video is killer. But audio messages are certainly a lot more effective from a call to action and a follow-up type of format where you can give that friendly nudging short audio message.

 

Daniel Disney:

But yeah, video definitely focus on the give. You can have a call to action. You can ask for something, but keep it simple, keep it basic. So it could be, “Hey, Will, loved your content last week. Just done a bit of digging when your profile, I see you worked for this company, yada, yada, yada, really think I might be able to help you with some LinkedIn social selling training. If you’re interested, I can pop you just a little bit of info on what the course would cover. Just pop me your email address and I’ll get that sent over straight away.” All I’m asking for is an email address. That’s all they have to reply. It’s minimal give from them, but they can then get more information on what it is I’m offering, which I’ve made relevant to them through the research and the references within that video message. So you can have a call to action, just has to be really minimal and simple.

 

A Step by Step Guide to Creating a LinkedIn Video Message · [13:30]

 

Will Barron:

Got it. I think we’ve glossed over a step here. We’ll take it back a few steps now before we get into the background, the video quality, the audio quality, what matters. How the heck do we send one of these messages, because we can’t do it, unless it’s changed, we can’t do it from a laptop and the browser experience, can we?

 

Daniel Disney:

No, no. So it’s done on the mobile app, which hopefully most salespeople watching this have or are able to get. And yeah, if you go into the message box, you’ll see the little video camera icon with the plus in the middle, click on that. And you’ll just record it straight from your phone directly through to LinkedIn, and then you’ll be able to send it across. So it takes away some of the pressure of having to do lots of editing or overthinking it. You can just record, send, done. So yeah, it is really simple to do on the app.

 

Will Barron:

Yeah, because this is something… I got a few of them and I was like… Because I don’t have the app on my phone. I’ve got two phones. I feel like I’m a drug dealer as I say that. I’ve got a work phone and a personal phone. The work phone just stays in the office and it’s used for all the apps and things that I need to post on social media and stuff like that. So on my normal phone, I actually would check LinkedIn in the evenings or in the mornings that I take with me. I don’t have the app. And it took me a while to source out that, hey, this is just… I don’t know about you, Daniel. Maybe you get it because you’re the king of social selling, but there’s plenty of features that I seem to get a year after everyone else. And I just thought it was another one of those features that you may have to apply or people in America get it first. And so that was a little bit confusing. So I’m glad you cleared that up for us.

 

Are Your Video Backgrounds Giving the Right Impression? · [15:06]

Will Barron:

So with that then said how… Again, this is common sense. But common sense isn’t always common. What should be in the background of these videos? Should this be in the office? Is this an opportunity to be a bit more casual and you’re chilled out with our potential customers and me wearing a bathrobe and our hairy chest is popping out the top of it or is this done in the office, suit and tie, with good professional lighting and done more appropriately?

 

Daniel Disney:

You want it to be as professional as possible, but certainly after the last year having it done at home is certainly more than acceptable, but do try and make an effort for those little details. I’ve seen… The worst sales video I saw, Will, and it makes me laugh and cringe at the same time, was someone recorded a video from their kitchen, but in the background was piles of dirty pots and pans and cups and plates really visible. And it’s little things like that where not everyone has space at home to build a mini studio or have a pop up background, but you should be able to find some way if not create a space that has some tidy area, something plain, minimalistic.

 

“Let your sales team have the equipment they need to send good video messages.” – Daniel Disney · [16:57]

 

Daniel Disney:

And then yeah, have things like lighting. I’ve got a USB ring light that I ordered off of Amazon. It cost me only twenty-five pounds, but it creates good, consistent lighting, whether I’m recording morning, day, or evening. And it just makes the video look a lot better. So a decent, strong background. Get a pull-up banner from Amazon. It’s going to set you back 40, maybe 50 quid, not huge costs for sales leaders out there. If you want your team to start sending good video messages, then from a company’s perspective, look at that as an investment, especially if remote working is going to become a bigger part. Let your sales team have the equipment they need to send good video messages. And if you are back in the office or you’re going to be heading back in the office, I’ve seen a lot of companies now build video pods in the sales floor, having special areas where salespeople can record the messages with a good background, good lighting, et cetera.

 

“Sales leadership should be investing into the team” – Will Barron · [17:21]

 

Will Barron:

I’m so glad you said that. I am hammering it home, especially on the show I do call the Sales Leadership Show, that sales leadership should be investing into the team. So I’ve always had a company mobile phone and stuff, but I’ve never had a good company mobile phone. It’s always been an iPhone that’s seven years old and has fallen to bits. So even things like that can make a big difference to the output quality. And if I feel obligated to use the company phone, then don’t moan at me when the video looks choppy and rubbish because it’s a phone that’s 15 years old. And the proper background is perfect. Just remove the environment from the videos. And of course, we’re all doing loads of Zoom calls, we’re all on Skype, Meetings, whatever it is, a pop-up background immediately just eliminates any issue or potential issues for both yourself and then family members. Maybe they don’t want to be in the background of your videos either.

 

Why Sales Leaders should Invest in High-Quality Sales Enablement Tools · [19:02]

 

Will Barron:

And you touched on it before we clicked record earlier on about dogs and other animals as well. It’s not a reasonable thing for a sales manager, sales leader to, if you’re forced to work from home, like we’re in lockdown in the UK again at the moment, it’s not a reasonable thing for them to start dictating whether the dog is going to be in the room, whether this kid’s in the background, whatever it is. But for the sake of a 5,000 quid pull up background and a USB light, that if you didn’t have that light on you right now, Daniel, the cap in front of your face would make your face completely black with down lighting from the top. And so these subtle, tiny things make just such a massive difference. And I think it’s on a lot of sales leadership to make these purchases. It’s nothing in the grand scheme of the revenue that our sales team drives. Just get it done. It’s something that I’m really trying to hound home at the moment.

We live in a digital virtual selling age, make sure your sales team has the right equipment to succeed in that.

 

“We live in a digital virtual selling age, make sure your sales team has the right equipment to succeed in that.” – Daniel Disney · [19:35]

 

Daniel Disney:

No, I’ve had a few good proactive sales leaders email me or Zoom me asking what equipment I would recommend. And I send them lists and they order it for their team. They upgrade their team. And then I see the quality increase in the video messages they’re sending and the success rates follow because people are going to reply or more likely to reply to video messages like that. It increases the quality, which increases the conversion. Little efforts, little details make a huge impact. But you’re right, Will, these are small costs in comparison. A lot of companies will put that money into other silly things. Invest it in the right things. We live in a digital virtual selling age, make sure your sales team has the right equipment to succeed in that.

 

Daniel Describes the Perfect Camera Positions For Recording LinkedIn video Messages · [19:52]

 

Will Barron:

Brands will spend a 100 grand, 200 grand on a big, stupid thing at an exhibition that just gets turned down and just thrown away at the end of it. So you could spend five grand fixing out your team with decent equipment. Okay. So with that said, should we be holding the camera? Should we be having the camera on a lot of stands? Should it be eye level? Does any of this stuff matter? Is the message the most important thing? How do we go about doing this now? I’ll give you my thoughts on this from… I’m slightly finicky about these things. So I’ll let you give the more appropriate answer first before I dive into it.

 

Daniel Disney:

Yeah. I think a lot of this is opinion-based, but certainly from my perspective, I’m personally a favour of having the camera, stood somewhere, lent somewhere, so that you’d… I’d speak with my hands anyway. But instead of having the selfie, if you’re sending a professional prospecting or sales message and you’re doing it right in front of your face with a selfie, for me, that just doesn’t give off the best possible impression. But again, certainly for me who likes to speak with my hands and try and be as engaging as I can through video, it certainly helps, I find, to have the camera propped in front of you. And again, you were able to then talk in a much more engaged way. Curious as to what your thoughts were on that though as well.

 

Will Barron:

Exactly the same. I didn’t want to put words in your mouth, but I agree with you. Just spend 15 quid on a little stand, put it on your desk. You press record, you look into it. Eye height, if possible, but there’s nothing worse than these videos. And I’ve said loads of them now. To prefer props when I get it, it’s people saying that they enjoy the podcast or they’ve signed up training that we do there and they’re enjoying things, as opposed to trying to professionally beat me, sell me something. But when you’re playing golf or you’re walking to the shops and you just, “I’ll just bash out some video messages,” if you are trying to sell me something and I’m getting seasick, like trying to follow your head around the screen and it’s all waving about, that does not leave a good taste in my mouth. So, I’m also just slightly… I enjoy video and audio production stuff as well, so I’m slightly more… I was hesitant to say too much before you give your response annual, because maybe I’m less tolerant of it just from the environments that I work in.

 

Daniel Disney:

No we’re on the same page, Will. It is little details like that, again, that makes such a big impact.

 

Will and Dan Debate on What’s More Important: The Quality of the Message or the Quality of the Video · [22:01]

 

Will Barron:

So from that then, which is more important? And again, this is… I know this is subjective. Other people might think this is subjective. Which is more important? The video quality or the audio quality of the message when learning how to prospect on LinkedIn.

 

Daniel Disney:

That’s a really good question. It’s all relevant the quality of the video, the quality of the audio. I would definitely probably preference a better camera than I would a microphone if I had to choose because I’d say the quality of the video itself is going to stand out a lot more than the quality of the audio from a sales messaging perspective. Again, it’s different when you’re creating content, it’s different when you’re recording a podcast or creating video content. And ultimately you want to have both, but yeah, personally for me it would be, yeah, quality of the video, the camera, et cetera.

 

Will Talks About His Dislike for Bad Quality Audio · [23:12]

 

Will Barron:

See, I would go aggressively the over direction. I would much rather you have some crappy old iPhone and you using… So when I do my video messages, I just have my iPhone and I use AirPods just Bluetooth connected. So I’m not saying we need ridiculous studio microphones and all this stuff. But let me just share, I guess, anecdotes then get your thoughts on this. I would much rather watch a grainy video with perfect quality audio than perfect video with grainy audio that is irritating, and I’m getting frustrated, even just talking about, Daniel. That graininess in audio where you’re struggling to hear. I feel like the audio, if I had to choose one of the over, hopefully we’ll do both, the audio is more important for me.

 

Daniel Disney:

Having listened to your podcast, Will, for years and years and years now, I know how much you care about audio, so I’m not surprised that what was your response. I think we’re lucky that most people you don’t have to get too extreme on either end, even with just your iPhone and the audio quality and the camera quality is going to be decent enough. And as you said, ultimately, try and do both. I have an external camera. I have an external microphone to make sure that both qualities there. And again, for sales leaders out there, that’s the sort of equipment that the modern sales rep needs now. You can’t just issue them a laptop and a company phone and expect that to be enough. You do need to think about all the things that can contribute to that sort of digital selling ability. So yeah, hopefully, salespeople will be able to tick both those boxes.

 

Landscape vs Portrait Video Formats for LinkedIn Video Messages · [24:40]

 

Will Barron:

Yeah, for sure. And the irony is a modern laptop has better microphones that are designed to be used at distance. Your phone does have directional microphones, but they’re typically not as sophisticated as what a MacBook or a modern laptop would be. So you probably get better LinkedIn video from a laptop than you would a phone at distance. So I know I’ve pondered about this and I’ve got… We’ll wrap up with the audience question in a second, Daniel, but should the videos be portrait or should they be landscaped? The app I’ve never tested it, I haven’t ever done it portrait, so I don’t know if the app will let you do one way or the other, because if we’re consuming it on a mobile device, portrait is going to be better. But if, like me, you consuming a lot of your LinkedIn content on a laptop, then a portrait video is always a bit awkward and cumbersome.

 

Daniel Disney:

So I’ve only ever done it on portrait. It’s funny you should mention that, really. I haven’t looked to try it in landscape. I think where it’s done through mobile, a lot of people are using LinkedIn on their mobiles, then they are going to be sort of getting it in the same way, but you’re absolutely right. I’m going to do a little test after this episode and just see if you can do it in landscape. Again, from a preference point of view, there’s going to be very small differences in the impact that both you make. So yeah, I wouldn’t worry too much about it, but you are right. A portrait one might come out a little bit different on a desktop than it’s being watched on.

 

Will Barron:

Yeah. It’s just slightly awkward, or maybe I’m digging too far into the weeds in this. And so we’ll move on to the audience question. And so with that, do you want, listeners to The Social Selling Show, do you want a free copy of Daniel’s book, The Million Pound LinkedIn Message? Then you can email your social selling questions, still can’t say the intro to the show, to [email protected] And if he features you on the show, like we’re going to feature Warren in a second, then we’ll send you a copy. That email address will be… I guess I’m having an open conversation with Daniel and the audience here. The email address will be [email protected] shortly, because I’ve got the domain as you need to set up that. We’ll get that done for the next episode.

 

Data and Case Studies on the Effectiveness of LinkedIn Video Messages · [26:28]

 

Will Barron:

So today’s question comes from Warren who asks, “Lots of people seem to have opinions about the effectiveness of LinkedIn video and audio messages, InMail too, but I’m not seeing any hard data on this. Do you guys have any real case studies over the anecdotes?” So he’s pushing us there, Warren is, Daniel. Have you seen any people reporting on data-backed studies on the effectiveness or the click-through rates or the view rate of video versus text versus InMail versus audio? Or are we all working on anecdotes here?

 

Daniel Disney:

A lot of it is anecdote-based. What I’ve seen from a data perspective is a lot of companies sharing individual stats to them and they differ so vastly. So I’ve seen most people seem to be comparing video messaging to cold calling instead of comparing it to other forms of LinkedIn messaging. And the conversions I’ve seen everything from two times all the way up to eight times more conversions compared to cold calling is the success people are finding through video messaging. Those are the only real tangible numbers that I’ve seen in the comparison stage. I then seen a lot of individuals report their own case studies, their own cadences that are working and their own successes that they’re having from an individual level, not based on the rest of their sales team, the rest of the company, rest of the industry, et cetera, but people are having successes with all.

 

Daniel Disney:

I’ve seen people share successes with written messages, people sharing successes with audio messages. And a lot of people sharing successes with video. And that’s why, as I mentioned at the start, you need to be utilising all of them. There’ll be people that will get that video message from you and hate it. I spoke to a decision-maker the other day and he was so passionate about his hatred of video messages, and it made him feel so uncomfortable having to watch someone on the camera record a message. But written messages were fine. That was their preference. They were happy to respond to that. So everyone’s going to be different. You’re only ever going to reach the biggest audience possible when you’re utilising all of them.

 

Will Barron:

Sure. That makes total sense. And we’re here to serve buyers in the way they want to communicate, as opposed to what is what we find… A lot of people say that people just do what they find quickest and easiest to spam, so that’s probably not the best way to go about it. And there’s loads of data on InMail and the effectiveness of InMail, but it all comes from LinkedIn. So how skewed that data is, that’s probably a topic for another conversation.

 

Daniel Disney:

That would be a good topic. Actually, we could dig into sales navigator. In terms of data backing up the success of InMail, I’d be shocked if it was anything more than some really tiny percentage, because my experience and the experience of working with other companies, there’s not a huge amount of success that can come from InMails, but we should tackle sales navigator because there’s so much you can do without it, but there’s a lot you can do with it. So we should definitely do, I don’t know, maybe a myth-busting sales navigator episode.

 

Will Barron:

Yep, that makes total sense. I’m going to jot that down in a second. With that Daniel, before we wrap up mate, anything you want to add from your perspective on LinkedIn video messages that we didn’t cover?

 

Dan’s Advice to Salespeople Who Aren’t Using LinkedIn Video Messages · [29:34]

 

Daniel Disney:

I tell you what, the one thing we haven’t covered, which is going to be my final notes on this. One of the hardest things to do when sending a video message is get started. For a lot of salespeople out there, if you’ve never recorded video content or sent video messages before, sitting in front of a camera and recording is quite a scary thing, almost just the scariest picking up the phone and making your first ever cold call. So my biggest tip for anyone who’s never done it before is just start practising . Don’t send anything out, just sit in front of your camera and start recording some short videos, get comfortable and confident in front of a camera. That can be sometimes the hardest thing to do. And it’s going to have a huge impact again, on the quality. So yeah, if you’re a bit scared or you’re not used to doing it, get some practise in upfront because it will make a huge difference, both in your confidence, but also in the quality of the video.

 

Will Barron:

Sure, and I won’t have the audience blow up your inbox, you can offer this, but I won’t press you to, because you’re audience on LinkedIn is much bigger than mine. If you are listening to this and you are connected with me on LinkedIn and you want to practise a video message, make sure that you send the video message and then immediately send me a message saying that you’re practising it and you want feedback as opposed to you’re trying to sell me some kind of overalls to fish trout, or something random that I would immediately just block you and accuse you of spamming me. Send me a message, immediately right underneath that you want some feedback on it and I’d be happy to give you some feedback. I think that could be potentially valuable for the audience.

 

Will Barron:

I don’t have anything to add. I think we’ve gone through a lot of content here. I think this is relatively succinct and it’s something that we should… I guess I’ll leave the audience with we should AB test this. If it works great, if it doesn’t, we don’t need to follow the hype. We need to do what works in sales. I think that gets overlooked sometimes.

 

Daniel Disney:

No, no. I’m with you, Will. It’s definitely something that should be utilised and I will open and extended the offer to anyone who wants video messaging reviews as well. Happy to review it, but do let me know that’s what it is because my inbox is the same as yours, Will, it’s filled with a lot of spam, so make sure it stands out. But as with anything, just go and get started. Don’t hide from it. Don’t try and avoid it. Embrace the change, embrace the way that sales is going, and go and capitalise it

 

Will Barron:

I love it. Well, with that, my name is Will Barron. That was Daniel Disney, the king of social selling. And we’ll speak with you again on next week’s episode. I’m going to say it slowly so I don’t mess up the title of the show. We’ll speak to you next week on next week’s episode of the Social Selling Show.

 

Daniel Disney:

See you next time.

SALESMAN WEEKLY EMAIL