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How To Effectively Price B2B Products And Services

Ajit Ghuman is a SaaS product marketing veteran and currently runs Product Marketing at Narvar. In this episode of the Sales Leadership Show, Ajit explains how to price B2B products and services and how sales leaders can make pricing strategies more effective.

You'll learn:

Featured on this episode:

Host - Will Barron
Founder of Salesman.org
Guest - Ajit Ghuman
Product Marketing at Narvar

Resources:

Transcript 

Will Barron:

This episode of the show is brought to you from the Salesman.org HubSpot Studio. Coming up on today’s episode of the sales leadership show.

 

Ajit Ghuman:

The problem with begging yourself to competition is that you’re saying, you’re only 10% better than them. So when I approach pricing, I look at it in three piece, positioning, packaging, and then placing. So it starts with your strategy, goes into the positioning, then goes into the packaging. And finally, you talk about the pricing. Let’s say you’re selling a book on Amazon. That’s the only lever you have, right? You don’t really have other packaging levers. You’re selling one-to-one books. That’s the only lever.

 

Will Barron:

Hello sales nation, and welcome to today’s episode of the sales leadership show. On today’s episode, we have Ajit Ghuman. He is the author of ‘Price To Scale’. And price is exactly what we’re talking about on today’s episode. Where price comes from for anyone who isn’t sure, who you should be going to if you feel like the pricing is wrong, and why you’re probably incorrect if you’re questioning the price from a sales perspective in the first place. Everything we talk about, it’s available in the show notes for this episode, over at thesalesleadership.org. And with that said, let’s jump right into it. Ajit, welcome to the salesman podcast.

 

Ajit Ghuman:

Thanks for having me, man.

 

How to Price B2B Products and Services · [01:38] 

 

Will Barron:

I’m glad to have you on. So we go down to a topic that’s for a sales leadership show and across all of the content over Salesman.org. We’ve never really covered, which is insane, right? We’re going to cover pricing, where it comes from, who should be setting the pricing, a whole different range of topics here that we’ll dive into. But to get us started, I want to ask you a massively loaded and leading questions. I’m sure answer isn’t this. But, is there a better way to price a product or service in the B2B world? Often seemingly what some people think pricing comes from which is, we map out all the competitors in the marketplace, and then we price our products, 10, 15% either side of it. Is there a better way to price a product than that?

 

“The problem with pegging yourself to competition is that you’re saying, you’re only 10% better than them.” – Ajit Ghuman · [01:57] 

 

Ajit Ghuman:

Of course. I mean, the problem with begging yourself to competition is that you’re saying, you’re only 10% better than them. Where you could be much more better than them. And it also undervalues and undermines your capabilities. You may be, you’re unique. And the question is how to price such that you capture the value delivered by our uniqueness. So that is, competition has a role to play in it, but certainly is not the guiding light.

 

How To Price Non-Unique Products and Services · [02:48]

 

Will Barron:

What’s your experience with this Ajit, clearly an expert in pricing? When you go into perhaps an organisation, perhaps you’re doing consulting, you write in the books and you speak to someone and they go, “Oh, well, but not all that unique on a surface layer anyway or the market doesn’t see us as unique”. Before we set the pricing, do we need to look at value propositions and that side of things?

 

Ajit Ghuman:

Right.

 

Will Barron:

Which comes first?

 

“When I approach pricing, I look at it in three piece. Positioning, packaging, and then pricing. So it starts with your strategy, goes into the positioning, then goes into the packaging. And finally, you talk about the pricing.” – Ajit Ghuman · [03:00] 

 

Ajit Ghuman:

Absolutely. So there is a big issue in software pricing today, which is where I come from. I’m a marketer first and a expert in pricing second. So when I approached pricing, I look at it in three piece. Positioning, packaging, and then pricing, right? So it starts with your strategy, goes into the positioning, then goes into the packaging. And finally, you talk about the pricing. There are other experts generally from consulting space who could directly only look at the price. I think that is fine. But, you should look at the positioning. Because your positioning will dictate, what are you and how are you offering the benefit to your target prospect or buyer, different from everything else, compared competition and alternatives. And that is your unique value proposition.

 

Ajit Ghuman:

And once you have that, then you can figure out, okay, based on my unique value proposition, I am actually better suited for X industry segment versus Y industry segment, and X industry segment will pay me much more than Y. So my packages will be different. So actually when you do that, you set the right foundation, and the foundation is everything in pricing. The price point is actually the very last thing. So that’s the nudge, TLDR.

 

The Impact of The Price of Product or Service Compared to Positioning and Packaging · [04:06] 

 

Will Barron:

Positioning versus packaging, how much of an impact does price actually have? And what I mean by this is, could we change the price 10, 15% on a successful product, either up or down, how much would that really affect the bottom line, the revenue versus the effectiveness of changing the packaging or the positioning of a product?

 

“The value we’re going to get out of moving the price point in a B2B setting is minimal. You may not get 10 to 15% variation because your sales person has to negotiate with the market.” – Ajit Ghuman · [05:09] 

 

Ajit Ghuman:

So the thing is that if you have a consumer product, that might be how you do it. Let’s say you’re selling a book on Amazon. That’s the only lever you have, right? You don’t really have great other packaging leavers. You’re selling one to one books. That’s the only lever. But the idea is to come up with more levers to pull. So if you are a software company, you have different packages, you have different industry segments, you have different ways to price. So you can price per event or API call, or you can price based on seat. And the way you intelligently find that can have you get 10 X more revenue, then you can figure out the right pricing structure. So the price point is the very last thing. So yes, you can do the price point. The value we’re going to get out of moving the price point in a B2B setting is minimal. You may not get 10 to 15% variation because your sales person has to negotiate with the market.

 

Ajit Ghuman:

If you’re a consumer company, that’s where you start to see more impact. Where Netflix improves its pricing by $2 and that’s a big change. So it depends. B2B companies, absolutely price point is the last thing to fiddle with. And it’s the least ROI of improving.

 

Who Is The Best Positioned Person to Come Up With Pricing in an Organisation? · [05:45]

 

Will Barron:

Amazing. And just to build that little bit of foundation for the audience, I myself included, right, of people often unfamiliar with where even pricing comes from. So say like you’re a sales manager or even a CRO, who comes up with the pricing at the end of the day? Is it always a product manager or is it marketing or could it be sales and the using sales data to generate this? Who’s the best person positioned to current with the pricing?

 

Ajit Ghuman:

Well, the best person is someone who is impartial and doesn’t have competing priorities. So I would say product managers are fine. Generally, what tends to happen is they have less time to figure this out. And it requires a lot of cross functional collaboration understanding different dynamics of the business. So yes, they could do it. Product marketing is generally the function that is chartered to do it, which is where I come from. Sales ops teams and CFOs also do it. But everybody tends to look at it from their side of the house. So every and anyone can do it as long as they are able to look at things holistically. The problem with sales specifically happens is, their compensation is tied to the price is tied to the revenue and everything has the number one complaint is the price is too high. So the sales team is going to look at very short term optimization.

 

Ajit Ghuman:

Even for them, long-term optimization might get them more money in their pockets. But, it’s hard to sometimes see things from a top down level. So I would say a central function such as a marketing team or a CFO’s team that has 360 visibility without any personal stake into it other than the increase in growth of the business should be the right person to do it.

 

Ajit Describes Experiences Where Salespeople Hounded Him to Lower Prices · [07:23] 

 

Will Barron:

Sure. You say that we’ve almost gritted teeth. Ajit, have you experienced sales leadership, salespeople hounded your office door, trying to get you to lower the pricing or give discounts or give options for them?

 

“Many times the issue of price is not the issue of price, it’s an issue of we didn’t communicate the value properly.” – Ajit Ghuman · [08:03] 

 

Ajit Ghuman:

Right. And, I call it a feature, not a bug. So I use that friction, right? Because that’s the barometer of how it’s going. If they’re not doing any of that, that means maybe the price wasn’t set correctly. Or if they’re complaining too much, maybe the pricing won’t be adopted. But there is a mid level of friction. I would say that is actually the golden place to be. So yes, it does happen a lot. And many times the issue of prices are not the issue of price, it’s an issue of we didn’t communicate the value properly.

 

Conceptual Frameworks For Setting Optimal Price · [08:35] 

 

Will Barron:

Sure. So is there a framework the product managers or whoever’s delivered developing the price for users? Because it seems like for a startup, right, you can experiment. Especially if your pricing isn’t public on your website, like a lot of startups don’t have it in the B2B space, you can charge one company one thing, and perhaps you charging a different product or service or slightly customising your service to another organisation. But as soon as we can then get into the enterprise pricing gets leaked. People are going to be annoyed, if not actually angry, that one organisation has been charged more or less than another. And in sales, I’ve had to deal with this and try to overly communicate to the difference in pricing, depending on the service that has been offered. So is there a framework to creating that price in the first place?

 

“There are only three main decisions that you are making here. One is to come up with your packaging. Second is to come up with your pricing metric. And third is to come up with the pricing structure. If you have defined all of this, you are able to justify then the price that you’re charging one customer versus the other.” – Ajit Ghuman · [09:30] 

 

Ajit Ghuman:

Yeah. So there is a lot of literature out there. Many people approach, many different frameworks. I think it’s interesting to look at an evolution of a company. So if you’re a enterprise, software company for example, you may start doing this ad hoc one by one pricing, right? Maybe the sales team drives the business and they’re doing this one by one pricing. And at some point this phenomena starts to happen. One, it’s not optimised. Two, customers are saying, “Well, what is the rationale?” And they’re not necessarily saying, give us the same price. They’re saying, tell me your rationale. So you basically need to come up with your structure. And so, well, the way I talk about it is it like, there are only three main decisions that you are making here. One is to come up with your packaging. Second is to come up with your pricing metric.

 

Ajit Ghuman:

And third is to come up with the pricing structure. If you have defined all of this, you are able to justify then the price that you’re charging one customer versus the other. So packaging could mean, Hey, there is a pro plan. There is an ideal plan. And the pro plan is for SMB customers. And elite plan has everything that enterprises need. And the pricing metric is where we are going to charge based on monthly active users, because that’s how the buyer is also going to make their money. And they’re going to be comfortable with that sort of metric, because it aligns with the growth of their business. And then finally, there’s the price structure and how we recapture revenue. Is it linear model two-part terrace and so on. Once we have that, I think most often customers say, well, why am I on this price? We’ll say, well, you have more capabilities. So we put you on this plan and you agree that this is the right pricing metric to use.

 

Ajit Ghuman:

And this is the agreement we had in the contract. Some other company will have roughly the same metric, roughly the same structure, but may have you on a different package. So it’s easy to compare and then justify why the price was different.

 

Will Barron:

How does- Sorry, go ahead.

 

Ajit Ghuman:

Go ahead. No, I think the last point I was only trying to make is once you have that, that’s where you move from being one by one pricing. And that taking time and sales team to just being plug and play. Now you have your pricing calculator, your sheets or whatever, and you still don’t have to publish it on the website. But then you can accelerate sales much faster because, the process that and the time that you were spending in all of this debate and discussion, one to one for every customer, now you’ve kind of automated it. And you’re just trying to close as many deals quicker as possible. So, that’s the benefit.

 

How to Justify and Communicate Pricing in an Organisation · [11:34] 

 

Will Barron:

You kind of touched on it then of wherever this goes on a website, wherever this is done via a salesperson business development rep or whatever it is, how much of the pricing discussion and being able to justify things, how much of this does need to be done openly and how much of it can be a black box? I know this is massively context.

 

“A lot of pricing literature nowadays assumes that the price will be on the website. I disagree with that completely. It depends totally on your business.” – Ajit Ghuman · [11:54] 

 

Ajit Ghuman:

No. That’s a good question. A lot of pricing literature nowadays assumes that the price will be on the website. I disagree with that completely. It depends totally on your business. So if you have a very horizontal business with roughly the same type of product that you want to sell to everyone, let’s say zoom software, right? Then you want to have it on your website, because you want to reach the whole world or a big chunk of it. But if you are selling to top fortune 50 companies, healthcare, and then maybe you’re selling to the government, I see limited value of putting your pricing on the website because every one of those healthcare companies are going to be different, government departments are going to be different, the implementation will be different. So by not putting it on the website, you preserve a lot of flexibility of giving somebody a bespoke offer and an offer that is tailored to them. So I’ve seen this a lot of times where companies will put the pricing on the website and then they will feel pigeonholed because, they didn’t think about the nature of their market before that they did.

 

How Sales Leaders Can Respond to Complaints From Salespeople About Price · [13:05] 

 

Will Barron:

That makes total sense. So I feel like we’ve built a good foundation here. So let’s bring this back to sales leadership. What should sales leadership be doing when, there’s two scenarios here, right? There’s one when salespeople are just moaning and salespeople myself included, like to moan about stuff that they feel like is getting them in the way, but perhaps isn’t. So what do we do when we’ve our sales team, when the mooning about price, is this just a conversation of we haven’t educated them enough on where the price has come from, and then we can go deeper down the rabbit hole from there.

 

Ajit Ghuman:

I think that the moaning can come from a few different places. Very often, I’ve seen that the one type of problem is, Hey, there is this new competitors come and they are much more expensive and we are really worried. Well, then the question is, should we be worried about them or not? What features are they offering? Are we communicating the value of our features well enough or not? And it unravels more times than not in unravels. One, an issue in our site communication about the higher end value that we’re offering to customers. Then we uncovered that we’ve not trained the sales team well on competitive analysis, they didn’t know battle cards, the first carldex don’t make sense. So all of those things that the salesperson needs to communicate on there. As a result, they feel fearful when the competition comes in, they say, “Well, they have a lower price”.

 

Ajit Ghuman:

Well, it’s not the point that they have lower price. That’s just a symptom of the problem, it is not the real problem. So that’s one kind of problem. Other kinds of issues when sales teams may be like, “Oh, their price is an issue”, is really poor packaging, for example. So, I’m writing a book on pricing and when I was writing it, I interviewed a lot of folks. One of the gentlemen, Johnny Chang, who I really respect one of the pricing leader. He mentioned, he came into a company and only one package was being used all the time. And the problem was the packages weren’t designed well. As a result, the sales team didn’t really know, should I choose the pro plan or the elite plan, or I’m just going to choose the pro plan because it’s cheaper. So it wasn’t really designed well.

 

Ajit Ghuman:

And a lot of those packages would have shelf ware afterwards. So they sell this plan. It would be only like, let’s say $10,000. On the other hand, the prospect may be willing to give you $40,000. That’s the whole different type of moaning when you’re leaving money on the table for every deal. And the sales person is frustrated, because they can’t make the number based on the product that you’ve made themselves. And, it’s almost a worst issue because that is an easily fixable problem, but setting the structure wrong can actually disable your sales team for a long time. So these are two ways I’ve seen this problem happen. Of course, there is the final problem, which is, yes, we’ve done everything correctly, but the price is an issue where we may want to re-look at the pricing, or we may want to look at discount. But, so these are different spectrum of things. When a sales person says there is an issue, and this is how I would say. These are some things to look at in order to diagnose it.

 

How to Incentivize Salespeople to Go After Profitability Rather Than Just Revenue · [16:07] 

 

Will Barron:

Sure. Is there any way that we can incentivize salespeople, whether that be financially or otherwise to sell and the most effective package? I don’t know what I mean by that is, we’re doing loads of contents at the moment. Post COVID on profitability, as opposed to just driving revenue. So depending on your organisation, revenue, top line might be really important if you’re a high growth company. That’s how that’s going to be looked at when you’re looking at future evaluations. For the majority of organisations, if anyone’s doing sensibly, profitability is clearly important. So say like, we are in a situation where we’ve got the team and we know that there’s far less margins on one product plan, but the sales team can sell it far easier. It’s less effort. The commissions, they don’t really care either way. But we know from an organisation perspective, the buyers will buy a more profitable plan if we put a bit more effort and more context or more medium or literature, whatever it is, if we can change the buyer journey slightly, we can route them towards that.

 

Will Barron:

Is there anything that we can do from an incentive perspective? Other than just say to the sales team, every one of those you sell, we’ll give you a $200 bonus. Is there anything else that we can do to incentivize these individuals, the sales team to go after profitability as opposed to just revenue?

 

“You may say, well, you get more of a discount or you get more flexibility and you’ll get more compensation if you sell X package versus Y. The problem is then the clients get forced fit into the wrong package. And then they churn later on, because you solved it via compensation. And the sales team at that point is just having their blinders on, seeing one customer as the same as the other.” – Ajit Ghuman · [17:58] 

 

Ajit Ghuman:

Yeah, that’s a tough question. But that’s a good question. There are ways to solve it. There is ways from compensation alignment, there is ways in terms of team structure. Team structure is the one that I’ve seen more often, where if you have, let’s say a high margin, medium velocity product versus a low margin, high velocity product, I’ve generally seen different teams tackle that so that the problem of choice goes away. You can definitely incent the team to do it. But the problem tends to happen is not at the time of sale, which you may actually be able to optimise for with compensation. You may say, well, you get more of a discount or you get more flexibility and you’ll get more compensation if you sell X package versus Y. The problem is then the clients get forced fit into the wrong package.

 

Ajit Ghuman:

And then they churn later on, because you solved it via compensation. And the sales team at that point is just having their blinders on, seeing one customer as the same as the other. So the team structure, bifurcating teams and having different people look at different portions is a little easier because they can still make their quarter, but they’re defined on, you go after small companies, you go after big companies. And that’s how the plans align. So at least in my experience, that’s how I’ve seen it. I’m sure there are more approaches to that though.

 

Will Barron:

Yeah, that makes total sense. Okay. So you alluded to it, this idea of churn, which is becoming more and more prevalent, not just in software sales or inside sales. My background in medical devices, as I left the organisation, we’re slowly transitioning from capital sales into service sales. I can’t remember the acronym that they were trying to push at the time. But rather than paying for all your cameras and endoscopes in operating room from you, pay for it as a managed service over 10 years, which obviously adds up to way more than just that one cups of that. So all marketplaces moving towards this nine times out of 10.

 

How Can Sales Leaders Encourage Salespeople to Go After Long-term Sales, Especially Now That Salespeople Have a High Turnover Rate · [19:25] 

 

Will Barron:

How do we incentivize, how do we retrain, how do we get salespeople on board to look at not just the sales, revenue and profitability now, but of that customer in five years? And I’ll throw the caveat in there of when salespeople turnover jobs on average every two years. So literally they’re not concerned of five years of the future, because they don’t think they’re going to be in the job for that long. How do we manage this?

 

Ajit Ghuman:

First of all, let me recognise that this is a big problem. And I agree with you about the problem. I run the pricing channel at a community called revenue collective. So it’s a place for all sale. It’s actually a community for sales leadership. And this is just a question I saw yesterday where they’re like, well, we sell these as products. They are at a slow entry level, right? 10,000, 20,000. And these become big accounts. Yet, our compensation is not aligned to them. I think that this is an issue in the industry today. I’m not anyone to say that I have the solutions, but I think the solution lies in the problem. And the problem that I see is that in terms of renewals, renewals drive expansions. And many times the role of the customer success team and the role of the sales team and the contribution of these teams in terms of growing that account, it can’t be undefined.

 

“In many companies, there is no definition for who brought in most of the money. And that creates not just problem of churn, but that creates frustration with the sales team. And, they feel like their incentives are misaligned.” – Ajit Ghuman · [21:07] 

 

Ajit Ghuman:

That’s the only first thing I will say, like, you have to define what is the contribution, the first dollar in is actually letting to bringing into the company versus the growth. Whatever the number, and however you distributed that is fine. But at least that’s an agreement that’s come upon. In many companies, there is no definition for the, who brought in most of the money. And that creates not just problem of churn, but that creates frustration with the sales team. And, they feel like their incentives are misaligned. And it also creates this challenge in this new model, it’s about relevancy of sales teams. And, higher leadership is having a debate about, well, if we can get away with it, we’ll get away with it. So, it really has to then talk about the value of the sales team as a more consultative collaborative function. And so it puts into question, not just questions of compensation, but it poses the question, how the sales team is building longer-term relationships? So it may be even a team configuration and skillset question, if you really look at it from a longer-term.

 

Ajit Breaks Down What Subscription Business Models Mean For Sales Teams · [22:10] 

 

Will Barron:

I know we talk about pricing care, but let’s just throw it kind of side topic for a second. Ajit, how do you feel sales is going to change from everywhere discussing care with pretty much every industry moving to this software or SAS as a monthly model, do you think sales is going to become less important? Will sales just become customer success eventually, if we can get enough marketing collateral upfront to get people into these deals? How do you think sales is going to change?

 

“You don’t have to be the person implementing the software for them, but you have to be the consultant and trusted partner throughout the relationship saying, well, you have done a good job Mr. Customer, of doing this. This has impacted your business, but I feel here is where you can do a little more to get the ROI from our product.” – Ajit Ghuman · [23:09] 

 

Ajit Ghuman:

I think the one place where I predict sales to change without having to rescale and become a pseudo customer success manager, is really in the place of seeing how customers succeed. So [inaudible [00:22:48] where I see sales changing is when they bring in a customer, they follow that customer as well, and they are able to join and assess the performance of that customer’s improvement with your company’s product and join the CSM, let’s say, in the quarterly business review and so on. And are able to be, again the consultant at all times. You don’t have to be the person implementing the software for them, but you have to be the consultant and trusted partner throughout the relationship saying, well, you have done a good job Mr. Customer, of doing this. This has impacted your business, but I feel here is where you can do a little more to get the ROI from our product, right?

 

Ajit Ghuman:

So, as long as you can follow the customer and are able to be that consultant, that is automatically then going to bring in expansions. And the problem is that, that’s how SAS companies or service companies, subscription companies, all of them are the same pricing model now, it’s subscription revenue. That’s how subscription companies are growing in terms of valuation and revenue. It’s through these expansion motions. So as much as sales is able to do that structurally, it’s going to be a win for the company. It’s going to be win for the salesperson and for the customer. So I feel like, the only change that has to happen is concerting, selling at the front end, and then going away, to being able to follow the customer and keep consulting them and be the trusted partner at their journey in the company’s life cycle.

 

The Benefits of Moving to a Monthly Subscription Model and Why Most Businesses and Adopting It · [25:56] 

 

Will Barron:

You make a great point. We’ll wrap up with this Ajit. I think this is valuable for the audience as well, if they’re going through this transition. I went from Southern capital products into just all of a sudden, we’re getting 20 grand bonuses for selling a managed service. And we’re all going well, but I can make a 100 grand if I just carry on doing what I’m doing. And in my world back then, it wasn’t communicated very effectively, the reason why we wanted to move to managed service. So you mentioned a company valuation there. For someone who is perhaps battling with a product marketer or I wouldn’t say dinosaur, but they are behind the times with some of this movement and they do really want to implement it themselves. Why do we want to move to this monthly subscription model? What is the benefits for the organisation? What’s the benefits for profitability? Why is everyone moving to this space?

 

“One of the stats that jump out is when the pandemic started last year, every other industry S&P 500 drew down 10% in revenues, subscription companies still grew 12 to 14%. That’s consistent. Even industries that are low margin industries become high margin industries with subscription revenue.” – Ajit Ghuman · [25:20] 

 

Ajit Ghuman:

So in general, there are a couple of companies that do a really great job analysing this a new way of doing things. So, Zuora is a company. They publish the subscription economy index. I look at them, their stats a lot too. One of the stats that jump out is when the pandemic started last year, every other industry S&P 500 drew down 10% in revenues, subscription companies still grew 12 to 14%. That’s consistent. Even industries that are low margin industries become high margin industries with subscription revenue. So it is a great way of actually creating loyalty from customers, because it’s based on this retention model and it’s aligned to their incentive, right? It doesn’t force them to spend a lot initially. And then it keeps them going with this retention model and expansion motion. And the company after company, you have to see the valuation at which companies are going public today.

 

“I was watching this presentation by Tom Tongas, who is the managing partner of Redpoint ventures. He mentioned how, not just your revenue growth rate, but your net dollar retention rate is one of the two key variables in getting to your final valuation.” – Ajit Ghuman · [26:06] 

 

Ajit Ghuman:

I was watching this presentation by Tom Tongas, who is the managing partner of Redpoint ventures. He mentioned how, not just your revenue growth rate, but your net dollar retention rate is one of the two key variables in getting to your final valuation. And these valuations are much higher than just those capital CapEx, one times spend approaches. Because, the churn for these companies is a lot lower as well. So there is a lot of data already in, higher growth, lower churn, higher valuation. That’s why it’s a no-brainer and every even non-tech companies are moving into this model now.

 

Why It’s Easier to Keep a Customer Buying Once They’re Already Your Customer Than Finding Multiple Fresh Customers and New Prospects · [26:45] 

 

Will Barron:

It does come down to the basic premise of, it’s easier to keep a customer buying once you’ve sold them in the first place versus finding multiple fresh customers and new prospects over time.

 

Ajit Ghuman:

Right. And aligning to their growth and value. So as long as you can align to their increase in ROI, you can keep nurturing that relationship.

 

Parting Thoughts: Ajit’s Book and His Consulting Expertise · [27:05] 

 

Will Barron:

Amazing stuff. Well, we’ll wrap up with that. Ajit, don’t you tell us where we can find the book. Because when this show goes out, it’s probably available and where we can find out more about you and the consulting and the expertise that you have as well.

 

Ajit Ghuman:

Yeah, totally. So for the book, it’s my website ajitghuman.com. That’s A J I T G H U M A N .com/pricing-book. I will also be putting it up on my LinkedIn, when it’s done. So just look me up on LinkedIn, Ajit Ghuman, and connect with me. And I’m happy to give you a little bit of a discount when the book arrives.

 

Will Barron:

Amazing. So far into the book, your website, everything else that we’ve heard about in the show notes of this episode, over at salesleadership.org. And with that, Ajit, I really thank you for your time and appreciate for you for coming on the sales leadership show.

 

Ajit Ghuman:

Appreciate it, Will.

 

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Want to become motivated and beat your sales quota with a simple selling tweak?

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