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Let That Sh*t Go And Reduce Your Sales Stress

Nina Purewal is the author of Let That Sh*t Go: Find Peace of Mind and Happiness in Your Everyday.

In today’s episode of The Salesman Podcast, Nina talks about how to reduce your levels of stress and protect your mental health in a post-pandemic world. 

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Featured on this episode:

Host - Will Barron
Founder of Salesman.org
Guest - Nina Purewal
Best-selling Author and Founder of Pure Minds

Resources:

Transcript

Will Barron:

Coming up on today’s episode of The Salesman Podcast.

 

Nina Purewal:

Stress is inevitable. So I think it’s a part of the package, if you’re running a business, if you are an entrepreneur, if you’re doing B2B sales, stress is going to happen. Inevitably, the biggest tip I can give is to be aware of our stress and when it’s coming on. So you can do that by being aware of the thoughts that are going on in your mind. You can do that by being aware of how it’s affecting your productivity at work. I’m an advocate and I teach mindfulness. So where I cope with stress about all appear in the mind. And the way that we, that I positioned in the mind is that we actually have two parts to our mind. One part is what I refer to as the chatty mind. Okay. It’s the mind that is constantly going. A lot of people in the space refer to it as the monkey mind is going from branch, to branch, to branch, or thought to thought, to thought. And this is the mind that we are so often in. We feel like this encompasses who we are.

 

Will Barron:

Hello, sales nation, I’m Will Barron, host of The Salesman Podcast. The world’s most downloaded B2B sales show. On today’s episode, we have Nina Purewal, while she’s the author of the book, “Let that shit go,” which you can find on Amazon and everywhere else online. And on today’s episode, we’re getting into how you can let that shit go. How you can reduce your levels of stress. It’s been a difficult year for a lot of people, 2020. And so hopefully there’s some value in this episode for you, if you’ve been feeling that stress and pressure. And so with that said, let’s jump right into it. Nina, welcome to The Salesman Podcast.

 

Nina Purewal:

Thank you for having me Will.

 

Is Stress a Natural Part of Our Life and Should We All Be Stressed in 2021? · [01:58]

 

Will Barron:

You’re welcome. I’m glad to have you on, and we’re going to touch on a subject today, which is not directly to do with driving revenue and selling. But if you get it wrong, can wipe out your opportunity of driving any revenue, because you’re going to be not in the right frame of mind to get anything done. And that is stress. So I want and talk about how we can source out what stress is and how we can potentially reduce some of it as well. So I’m going to ask you a massively loaded and leading question. And if the answer is yes to this question, Nina, the interview is pretty much over. We could wrap up here. But in a world where we’re constantly getting bombarded, customers notifications, we’ve got to do this. We’ve got to do that. I feel like stress is almost inevitable at this point and stress year on year, it seems to be increasing. Is this, should we be accepting of this or is there a better way to go about dealing with stress and it by default, should we be stressed at this point in 2021?

 

“Stress is inevitable. I think it’s a part of the package, if you’re running a business, if you are an entrepreneur or if you’re doing B2B sales, stress is going to happen inevitably. We think on average 60,000 thoughts a day, we’re aware of less than 1% of them. 80% of them are said to be negative. And so stress naturally happens. It’s the function of the mind to stress. But what we can do is, we can better handle the stress.” – Nina Purewal · [02:36] 

 

Nina Purewal:

Yeah, I think it’s an interesting question, and an important one and I think stress is inevitable. So I think it’s a part of the package, if you’re running a business, if you are an entrepreneur or if you’re doing B2B sales, stress is going to happen inevitably. We think on average 60,000 thoughts a day, we’re aware of less than 1% of them. 80% of them are said to be negative. And so stress naturally happens. It’s the function of the mind to stress. But what we can do is, we can better handle the stress. So we can have tips and tools to help us handle those thoughts when they come up, if their stress inducing.

 

Warning Signs You’re Way Too Stressed · [03:10] 

 

Will Barron:

So with that said, then if this is almost a natural symptom of being alive, right? Of just existing, how do we know when stress has become an issue? I know this is massively subjective and I’m not necessarily talking about getting to the realms of depression or anything clinical here. I’m talking day-to-day sales business stress, just to keep myself on the straight and narrow here of our conversation. Do people have a threshold and then when the daily stress goes beyond that, they feel crap, but be below that threshold they feel fine or is it more of a grey area in a sliding scale, as to people’s stress level and their ability to cope with it?

 

“Is your heart racing more often, are your palms more sweaty. Do you wake up at night with that heavy breathing? So there are different ways that you can evaluate how stress is affecting you. And when you notice it is, then that you can use certain tips and tools to help mitigate it.” – Nina Purewal · [03:56] 

 

Nina Purewal:

I think it really depends on each person. Each individual person handles stress differently. But the biggest tip I can give is to be aware of our stress and when it’s coming on. So you can do that by being aware of the thoughts that are going on in your mind, you can do that by being aware of how it’s affecting your productivity at work. You can do that by even being aware of physical symptoms, is your heart racing more often, are your palms more sweaty. Do you wake up at night with that, the heavy breathing. So there’s different ways that you can evaluate how stress is affecting you. And when you notice it is, then that you can use certain tips and tools to help mitigate it.

 

Will Barron:

Yeah. This is really gross. I never really ponded on this before. I don’t know if I’m just stressed constantly, but I have sweaty palms all the time, Nina. I don’t think this is, I don’t think I’m stressed all the time, but I appreciate what you’re saying. Moments of acute stress. So I trained Brazilian jujitsu, this ridiculous martial art, which have people rolling around on the floor, strangled in each other and dressing gowns basically. But I know that taught me something really valuable of, just before a competition, when I’m just about to go wrestle someone and probably lose those faults, not necessarily thoughts. There’s physical manifestations of sweaty palms, heart racing. I never really considered those stress. And it was only when I was putting those acute situations that then my brain tied that to stress day to day.

 

How To Tell You’re Overstressed and How To Gauge Your Daily Stress Levels · [05:40]

 

Will Barron:

And I thought maybe I was trying to convince myself otherwise. Maybe I was trying to convince myself that I was excited or I try and talk myself and use self-talk to avoid some of these stresses. But since training and competing in Brazilian jujitsu, it’s taught me what stress actually is and how to become more self aware of it. For people who for example me, five years ago, before I had these experiences, is there any other ways to tell and become more self-aware of our stress levels day-to-day? Let me put this in a way, is this something that we should be checking in on throughout the day or do we just deal with this when we get to a big crunch point in our lives where things start to fall apart?

 

Nina Purewal:

Yeah. You want to get to the point where you don’t have to hit that crunch point. You want to be preventative about it. I’m an advocate and I teach mindfulness. So where I cope with stress, it’s all up here in the mind. And the way that we, that I positioned the mind is that we actually have two parts to our mind. One part is what I refer to as the chatty mind. Okay. It’s the mind that is constantly going. A lot of people in this space to refer to it as the monkey mind is going from branch< to branch< to branch, or thought, to thought, to thought, and this is the mind that we are so often in. We feel like this encompasses who we are. But we actually have another part of our mind, which is so useful, which I refer to as the observing mind. And the observing mind, just simply observe the chatty mind going on and on and on about all these thoughts and stressors. And the observing mind works like a muscle, right?

 

“Once you get into that fourth or fifth thought of thinking about the same thing, that’s when you just start to spiral.” – Nina Purewal · [07:15]

 

Nina Purewal:

So the more you lean into it, the more you’re going to be able to leverage it. And so if once in a while, we can lean into the observing mind. And it sounds like this, oh, there you go stressing about work again. Oh, there you go, worried about that argument that you got into. When you can observe what’s happening in your mind, that’s the moment where you know something’s off and you can switch your internal dialogue because it doesn’t take long. One of my mentors told me, it’s just, once you get into that fourth or fifth thought of thinking about the same thing, that’s when you just start to spiral. So if you can catch it, because the chatty mind is going to think thoughts. That’s not going to ever go away. That’s just part of our makeup. Once you can catch it and switch the internal dialogue, that’s the most useful tool is just awareness of that chatty mind.

 

Will Barron:

I’m going to throw something at you now. And I want you to tell me if this is complete bullshit because I have not seen. I’ve seen science suggest some of this and I’ve seen a lot of science that says, who the heck knows. So interesting for us, but unfortunate for the people who it affected. I’m not sure whether it was epilepsy or whatever it was, but there was a period of time when people who had, I think it was epilepsy. They did essentially brain experiments on these individuals, terrible, shocking thing, but hopefully something good come from it. And then we can study these individuals. And one of the things that they did was, the two hemispheres of the brain, the separated them. And they did these experiments. One of which, I find this fascinating.

 

Will Barron:

One of which was they’d have a board literally in between the eyes of the individual. So that one eye and one hand is on one side and one eye on one hand is on the other side of this board. And they would ask the individual, Hey, pick up your favourite fruit and the individual pickup, a banana in one hand and an apple in the other, essentially different fruits or different toys or whatever it was. And they would, you’d ask the individual what’s your favourite? And they would be convinced that whichever one side or the other was what they’d had in both hands. So then this was suggesting that the two separate sides of the brain are completely separate. And this is what these two, this I guess is a theory. That you’ve got the chatty side of the brain, which has the speech and language processing parts of the brain built into it.

 

Will and Nina Talk About The Chatty Mind, The Observing Mind and How They Both Influence Our Decisions · [08:16] 

 

Will Barron:

The other part of the brain doesn’t have just the structure. It does not have the speech and language portions of them and the makeup of the cortex. And so could this be the case? I know I’m putting you on the spot here and, but we’re almost philosophising about this. Could it be the case that the chatty side of the brain is literally one side of the brain and then the other side of the brain didn’t have a voice. It didn’t have the vocal capacity to speak, but it’s observing what’s going on, on the other side of things. I know I’m just throwing a lot at you there, but does that make sense?

 

Nina Purewal:

It does make sense. I would say no, because if were asked to pick up a fruit and they had a choice and then they made a choice in both decisions. And that means that, that chatty mind is working. And the way I see the observing mind is it’s overarching any type of decision you make. And it’s a witness more to that thinking mind, if that makes sense.

 

How To Silence Your Chatty Brain and Be More Observant · [10:18] 

 

Will Barron:

So similarly, I think it does somewhat work in that context. Maybe I need to explain it better. I’ll put some links in the show notes, just for anyone who’s ponder on that. But this is something I’ve thought about for the years now, since I read that original research of a split in the two hemispheres of the brain. So with that said, anyway, that’s a side note said, how do we I’ll send, I’ll send some things after the show to the papers on it. But how do we then? Because it doesn’t matter how it sets up and how the brain is structured, we’re living in this reality. How do we become more observant of the chatty brain and how do we tell it just to shut up?

 

Nina Purewal:

Yeah. It’s actually a practise. So a couple of things you can do. One thing is you can work to become more present and in the moment, right? So when the chatty brain is going off and the observing mind notices it, one thing you can do is just take a couple of really deep breaths. And I know that’s something that is so overplayed, but it really helps. And the technique is key. Taking really big belly breaths. Another thing you can do is lean into your senses. When you notice your mind is going off, you can what am I seeing? Acutely aware of your five sentences. Another way to help leverage, using the observing mind is to start speaking out loud what you’re doing. And I know this sounds totally crazy. I lived in an ashram for a year, so I studied under many monks around the world. And this is one of the tips from one of the monks was, let’s say you’re doing dishes and your chatty mind is going off in all directions, which it does. Right?

 

“I think there’s a big misconception on mindfulness that you’re just present 24/7. That’s nearly impossible, even for the monks meditating in the mountains.” – Nina Purewal · [12:06] 

 

Nina Purewal:

We’ve all been in situations where we’ve gone from point a to B, we got to point B and you’re like, how on earth did I get here? Or you’re showering or doing the dishes. You’re physically somewhere, but you’re mentally somewhere else. So you can start by speaking out loud what you’re doing. So let’s say you’re doing the dishes. Your dialogue is going to sound something like, now I’m putting soap on the sponge. Now I’m making circular motions on this pot. Now I’m putting this pot on the drying rack and slowly and fully, your mind will learn how to catch the chatty mind and move back to the present moment. And even if you’re doing the dishes for 20 minutes, you might have to reign your chatty mind at 30 times. Right? I think there’s a big misconception on mindfulness that you’re just present 24/7. That’s nearly impossible, I think even for the monks meditating in the mountains. So those are three really good tips, breathe, leaning into your senses and also I’m speaking out loud what you’re doing. Those are great ways to become aware of your mind.

 

Will Talks About How He Manages Stress · [12:26]

 

Will Barron:

And I guess, it ties into a lot of those elements. As I’m pondering on this inadvertently is, if I’m really annoyed about something, if someone’s pissed me right off, that chatty brain is going round and round in circles. And they start off being reasonable maybe, and then you end up down a rabbit hole of how they’ve ruined your life over just an email, or something that is obviously nonchalant and you shouldn’t be even given any energy. Something that I like to do is just, I have a journal. I just have a Word document open on my computer and I’ll write in it and just be like, okay, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. They’re idiots. And then immediately I get this switch. I feel it’s almost like a physical switch. My body switches. It might be a switch from a parasympathetic to sympathetic nervous system. And immediately I just go, oh, maybe I’ve been, maybe I didn’t communicate this effectively. Maybe this and maybe that. And I play devil’s advocate with myself. And that’s pull it into the three elements that you described there just, I guess, another format and another way of doing it.

 

“Some people like to talk to people. Some people internalise and like to journal. Some people like to go out in nature and go for a walk. So I think having that list of, what are the five things I can do when I find myself spiraling is a really great way to just be effective with the stress.” – Nina Purewal · [13:30] 

 

Nina Purewal:

Yeah. There’s, I think it’s very personal, how we all manage and deal with stress. So as long as you know your triggers, what stresses you and again, be aware of them and then how to calm yourself down. Some people like to talk to people. Some people internalise and like to journal. Some people like to go out in nature and go for a walk. So I think having that list of, what are the five things I can do when I find myself spiralling is a really great way to just be effective with the stress.

 

How To Assess Whether Your Stress Management Practices are Working · [13:50]

 

Will Barron:

So this is going to seem like a, I’ve asked you a few, they’re not stupid questions, but they’re extremely simple questions, but I think that they have value. How do we know if this is working? How do we know if our stress levels are reducing? Is this, can we measure this by productivity? I don’t know if that’s the best way to go about measuring it. How do we know if what we’re describing here is being effective to, for us?

 

Nina Purewal:

That’s a great question. So I tell a lot of my corporate clients, you’ll notice the change in your productivity. You’ll notice a change in your overall happiness. You basically become a better version of yourself. You’re not as irritated, or irritable all the time. You can also ask your family members for feedback because the people closest to you will notice a shift in you. And you’re just less reactive. When things happened to me 10 years ago, I would go into a terrible spiral. In there for a couple of days, I was into my own head a lot and now I’m just way less reactive. Things happen, it’s like, okay, it is what it is, move on. So you’ll notice, you’ll essentially become a better version of yourself.

 

Stress Management Attitudes and Practices For Salespeople ·  [15:02]

 

Will Barron:

Sure. That that reactivity is key for salespeople as well of if you have a bad cold call, a meeting, whatever it is, the sooner you can just drop it and go, okay, I’m not in control of how they felt when they slammed the phone down on me. I’m only in control of what I could say to them, perhaps I could have communicated better. Then I know that lifts like a weight off my shoulders. It almost puts a bit of the pressure on someone else. It allows me to just, to do what I need to do. And if that’s somewhat effective, we’re going to be all right with things.

 

“One of the big things in sales is you can’t control how people are going to react to you. You can only control what you put out there.” – Nina Purewal · [15:40] 

 

Nina Purewal:

Yeah. Exactly. We talk in the book, Let that shit go, about bucketing things into your life and what you can control and what you can’t control. And one of the big things in sales is you can’t control how people are going to react to you. You can only control what you put out there. And my mom used to say, “Do your best and leave the rest.” That’s all you can do. You can only do your best and then there’s no regrets. If you do your best and you still get hung up on and you still get the, no, Hey, that’s all you can do. If you ruminate about the person that hung up on you or the sales person that said, no, that’s just adding more stress. That’s affecting your productivity. That’s affecting your overall confidence and how you put yourself out there as a business. So bucketing things and what you can, and can’t control can be really powerful.

 

Stress Buckets For Your Personal and Professional Life · [16:30] 

 

Will Barron:

For sure. Because we don’t know [inaudible [00:16:15] so why don’t you have no idea what’s going on in their world at that moment. Right? So it could be a perfectly good message. It could have been a perfectly good conversation starter and they throw it back in your face because of who knows, especially right now there’s a lot of turmoil going on in the world, right? So you mentioned this idea or concept of buckets. Should we have, should work be its own bucket in that, we do work and then we leave it behind? I know this is becoming more and more difficult with leaders, sales managers wanting to email you at 10 o’clock, 11 o’clock or whatever it is. Is this something that we should be forceful in that, we have work life separation. Is the value in that, especially with a lot of people now working from home?

 

Nina Purewal:

Yeah. Absolutely. And this is one of the things my clients struggle with the most right now, especially in the pandemic is this blurred line between work and home because a lot of people are working from home. And prior to the pandemic, there was a physical indication of, I’m shutting down. I am physically leaving the office. I’m now entering my safe space, which is home. Now people have their laptops on their, their set up on their kitchen table or they’re set up in their kitchen counter. And suddenly it’s so easy to quickly check in. And so the lines are very blurred. But it is absolutely important to bucket and [inaudible [00:17:32] things into work versus home versus joy and play. I mean, because it’s typical that you’re at work and you’re stressing about the kid who hasn’t finished the project or you’re suddenly at home and now you’re stressing about the 20 projects that you have on the go.

 

Nina Purewal:

So that’s one thing that has really helped me personally, is when I’m at work, I’m focused. I’m at work. And then when I’m at home, I’m with my family. And if a thought comes up about work, it’s like my observing mind notices and goes, no. Not right now. And that helps because a lot of, again, as I said earlier, 80% of the thoughts we think tend to be negative. So if we’re just sitting there ruminating about work and we can’t physically do anything, like let’s say, we’re playing a family game for an hour. I’m not going to physically leave and go answer that email. So thinking about it is not serving me any well. It’s taking away from my family and it’s not making them more productive. So bucketing things in your personal life and professional is a great tool to have.

 

Why Does The Chatty Brain Exist? · [18:30]

 

Will Barron:

Is there any reason why? That chatty brain is clearly, it’s part of human evolution. We all have it, it’s not fluke. It must be there for a reason. Why does it remind us to send that email and pester us to call this person and do that and finish this task. And second guess whether you are doing well in oh four you’re you’re good enough and you’re worthy enough. Why does it exist, Nina?

 

“I think some stress is good. We’re so quick to say stress is bad, but sometimes stress motivates us and stress pushes us to the next level. And sometimes people put out their best work when they’re procrastinating and they’re really stressed and suddenly they hit a peak. The key is knowing when that stress is serving you well and when that stress is detrimental” – Nina Purewal · [18:58] 

 

Nina Purewal:

Yeah, I think some stress is good. I mean, we’re so quick to say, stress is bad, but sometimes stress motivates us and stress pushes us to the next level. So we have to have something to keep us going and to remind us of all the task lists and whatnot. And sometimes people put out their best work when they’re procrastinating and they’re really stressed and suddenly they hit a peak. So I think it’s necessary. The key is knowing when that stress is serving you well. And when that stress is detrimental.

 

Will Barron:

Sure. I think if we, this is a stupid example, but I think if we went back, I don’t know, 50,000 years, that bit of stress that maybe there’s someone in the jungle is just about to attack us. And we should probably look at that jungle and we should probably just investigate this and I can’t let you drop it until you’ve done this thing. That was probably more valuable than what it needs to be now, because the world’s so much safer than what we used to live in.

 

Nina Purewal:

Yeah. Exactly. It’s that whole, activating the sympathetic and the parasympathetic nervous system, right? Back in the day, we were being chased by a sabre tooth tiger and we were stressed. And now that sabre tooth tiger is happening like 20 times a day, used to happen maybe once a month. And now it’s happening every which way we turn an argument with a partner or a frustrating email that you got from work or a rejection. So it’s so important to activate that parasympathetic nervous system and make sure that we’re not constantly being reactive to the stress around us.

 

Perspective and Being Present with Your Stressors · [20:29] 

 

Will Barron:

I don’t know how you do it. You’d have to stick some kind of probe into people’s brains over decades. But it’d be interesting to see actual brain activity from 10 years ago to now, because I want to talk about perspective in a second. But we all feel like we’re more stressed than ever before. And it seems like we’re probably more stressed than ever before, but don’t know how much data there is on that. And that leads us to perspective. I know you talk about perspective in the book. How do we, or is it possible to accelerate our perspective on life? Because I know, I thought I was stressed and struggling when I started this business salesman.org, say like five, six years ago.

 

Will Barron:

But if it was me who went back in time now it’d be a joke. I didn’t even work that hard because I didn’t know what I should have been doing, but I was stressed in the moment. And I’m sure 10 years from now I’ll look back at this moment and go, it was absolutely a nice little business to be running. So is there any way to increase our ability to generate perspective or to have more perspective in the moment of what we’re doing?

 

Nina Purewal:

Yeah. Absolutely. And I think what you touched on is key, relativity. I asked a lot of executives, what’s your stress level like? It’s 10. It’s nine. It’s 10. And then I ask them, okay, what is the worst possible thing that could happen to you in life, personally and professionally. Obviously, it’s always losing someone dear to you. And okay, that’s a 10. So if that’s a 10 now, what is your stress level as an executive or CEO? And suddenly, okay. That doesn’t seem so bad. And I personally experienced this actually when I was a GM for an environmental company called TerraCycle. In the same month that I got that role, my mum was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease or ALS.

 

Nina Purewal:

And I used to be a big stressor at work. Always in my own head. Stressing all the time. Checking my email, 1, 2, 3, 4 o’clock in the morning. But then when that happened, everything changed. Ironically, it was the most senior role I’d ever been given, but I was the least stressed because at the end of the day my mom was dying. And no email was as important as experiencing this life experience. So I got out of my own way a lot. I got into my own head a lot. I could email the global CEO without thinking twice. And I could send out a big email without going, how’s he going to react? How she going to react? If this is what’s best for the business, this is what I’m sending out. And then when I got in my car at five o’clock to get home, all I could think about was, got to spend time with mom.

 

“If in the morning when we wake up, instead of just picking up our phones and scrolling and noticing we’re behind on email and got this and this and this. If we can just spend two minutes going, you know what? I’m alive today and all the important people around me are okay. That should reset your stress level for the rest of the day.” – Nina Purewal · [23:21] 

 

Nina Purewal:

Before my whole drive from work at home, my whole dinner conversation was all work. Right? So we’ve all had those moments, right? When we see something tragic happened or we’ve gone to a funeral and we reset and we’re just like, oh, I’m so grateful to be alive. I’m so grateful to have my family. And so if we can just do something small each, even if in the morning, when we wake up, instead of just picking up our phones and scrolling and noticing we’re behind on email and got this and this and this. If we can just spend two minutes going, you know what? I’m alive today and all the important people around me are okay. That should reset your stress level for the rest of the day.

 

Will Barron:

Sure. So this sounds so cheesy, but I’ve told you about it on the podcast for everyday. There’s a local park around in Leeds, I go to. It takes five minutes to walk around it. On the way there, I just think of stuff that I’m grateful for. And the first few things are, I’m grateful, I’ve got a job. I’m of grateful this, but then 10 minutes into that actually gets two points that I’ve never really pondered about. And then on the way back, just to balance things out a little bit, I ponder on things I want. Whether it’s, when I get a new hire, I want to hire these marketing organisations to come and help us out, whatever it is. Want to get this deal done, whatever it is. And that puts me in a really good mindset for the rest of the day. And I find if I don’t do that, I’m just on. I’m not really thinking about things, I’m not really.

 

Questions to Ask Yourself For Better Stress Management · [24:56] 

 

Will Barron:

I’m just going through the motions that I’m being, the best word early on, Nina, I’m being reactive to everything. And something else I like to do and I’m just going to throw stuff at you here. I appreciate, I’m doing a bit more talking than I usually do on these shows. But another question I ask myself is when I’m in a stressful situation, is I ask the question, even what’s the worst that can happen or if five years from now I was to look back at this, would I give a shit about it at all? Would it even be a blip on my radar? So with those three examples of there, are there any of the things that we should be doing? Any of the questions that we should be asking ourselves or anything else that we should be doing in our routine, just to wrap up the show here, if we feel like we do need to get on top of our stress?

 

“I had a monk once tell me, “Meditate before you enter the world.” And what he meant by that was, once you look at your phone, once you have that conversation, it’s over. You’re already in that space of, I got to do this, got to do that, comparing yourself, whatever it is.” – Nina Purewal · [25:20]

 

Nina Purewal:

Yeah. I think again, as I said, this journey is so personal. So you need to know what works for you. I find morning time is best. I had a monk once tell me, “Meditate before you enter the world.” And what he meant by that was, once you look at your phone, once you have that conversation, it’s over. You’re already in that space of, I got to do this, got to do that, comparing yourself, whatever it is. So I find the most effective times in the morning. So I’m glad you go for your little walk in the morning. And just take anywhere from five minutes to half an hour, to do something to ground you, whether that is meditate, yoga, journal walk.

 

Nina Purewal:

And just again, it’s a moment to be aware of your chatty mind and try to mitigate that ongoing chatty mind talk and lean into that observing mind. Because like you said, if you do it in the morning, it sets the stage for the rest of your day. As a meditator, I mean, I noticed the days I meditate, I feel a lot more calm and less reactive. The days I don’t, I’m just a little bit more on edge. So if you can do something that works for you in the morning for yourself, I think that’s a great way to help mitigate stress for the rest of the day.

 

Tips, Apps, and Books Nina Would Recommend For People Learning How to Meditate · [26:24] 

 

Will Barron:

So you’ve said the word meditate there. Now, when I started the podcast, five, six years ago, meditate was a weird word. It was hippies that would sit on a rock and maybe you’ve got to shave your head and wear a bathrobe. I don’t know. I think now clearly, the likes of Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos and all these celebrity entrepreneurs have normalised it for a lot of people. So do you have a… Clearly, you so what trained in a an environment with monks, clearly meditation is involved in this. So this might be more personal to you than what you’d just advise to someone who’s brand new to it. But is there any apps or processes or any ways of going about meditating that you recommend for someone who is a little bit, should probably try it, but it also sounds a little bit bizarre?

 

“There is no right or wrong way to meditate. I think there’s a lot of pressure that I have to sit like this. I have to do this. I have to listen to this. Again, it’s very personal. So you have to find a practise that works for you.” – Nina Purewal · [27:28] 

 

Nina Purewal:

Yes. Absolutely. I’ve been meditating for 15 years. It’s totally changed my life. I’ll give you a couple of my tips and then I can pass you on over to some wonderful apps and book recommendations. But in terms of tips, the first thing to know is, there is no right or wrong way to meditate. I think there’s a lot of pressure that I have to sit like this. I have to do this. I have to listen to this. Again, it’s very personal. So you have to find a practise that works for you, whether it’s listening to nature sounds or a guided meditation. The second thing is, your thoughts don’t stop. So a lot of people think that if they’re sitting in meditation and a bunch of thoughts come through, they’re doing it wrong.

 

Nina Purewal:

I have a lot of clients say, I can’t do meditation. I say, why? My thoughts don’t stop. Well, your thought, like I said, I’ve been meditating for 15 years, I’ve never had a meditation where my thoughts, my chatty mind, hasn’t tried to come through. So if it comes through again, it’s an opportunity to be acutely aware of what’s coming through and use that observing mind to just watch the thoughts come and go. And lastly, meditation is just, it helps you, as I said earlier, become a better version of yourself. You’re more calm. You’re less reactive. But even if you try it for 30 seconds in the morning, for one week, and then add on a minute for the next week. And then a minute and a half. There’s some people out there, well, you have to meditate for half an hour every morning, it’s not. It’s going to be so intimidating if you go into it like that. Just try a little bit.

 

Nina Purewal:

Some really great apps are Headspace. I’m sure you’ve heard of Headspace. Calm, Buddhify, Insight Timer. I find Headspace the most effective because it’s very pragmatic. So you start off really small. It really helps you build up your practise. And then there’s a lot of great books out there on meditation. Again, you have to see what authors you have affinity towards and what has the most practical tips for you. I got one book here, it’s upside down. The entire last chapter is on meditation. And it’s very, if you want to enter this space, check out this chapter, it’s filled with tips on just how to practise and how to elevate your practise, if you already do.

 

Will Barron:

Perfect. I’ll ask you about the book in a second. But just to double down on, I would have never meditated in a million years if I hadn’t found the Headspace app. I’ve not used it in, once you learn the processor structure, clearly you don’t need an app to guide you through every time. So I assume it’s the same now, but it was a few years ago, just five minutes. And each time Andy from Headspace would introduce something new to the mix, just to keep you interested and engaged. And I would say I’ve had, maybe if I meditate for 10 minutes, I would get 20 seconds right at the end of that meditation practise, where my brain would just seemingly, just nothing would go across it. And then I’d realise nothing’s going across it. So then you’ve had a thought about nothing.

 

Nina Purewal:

Yes. Exactly.

 

Meditating To Reset Your Brain After a Long or Stressful Day · [30:14] 

 

Will Barron:

So there’s 20 seconds, but I know. So I do this every day. I should do every day. If I’m feeling tired throughout the day, if I’ve just had a big lunch, or loads of meetings or doing loads of podcast, I will do a 10 minute meditation using this Headspace model, which is probably generic to other places as well. Right? And I come back massively refreshed. I don’t just do it for my mental health. I do it to give me another three or four hours worth of work, after the fact as well. I find it’s really beneficial from that perspective.

 

“Mental exhaustion leads to physical exhaustion. You can be sitting at a desk all day and your mind is just getting the best of you and suddenly you’re just tired. Meditating is resetting your mind. It’s clearing out all the crap and giving you a clear headspace to start.” – Nina Purewal · [30:50] 

 

Nina Purewal:

Yeah. Some people say it feels like they’ve had a good nap. You’re just, again, you’re getting rid of all that clutter. Because mental exhaustion leads to physical exhaustion. You can be sitting at a desk all day and your mind is just getting the best of you and suddenly you’re yeah, you’re just tired. So it’s resetting your mind. It’s clearing out all the crap and giving you a clear headspace to start.

 

Parting Thoughts: Nina’s Book, Corporate Workshops, and Her New Masterclass · [31:05]

 

Will Barron:

Perfect. That reset is exactly how I’m going to describe it from now on. So with that, Nina, tell us about the book. Tell us about the corporate workshops that you do and also the new master class as well.

 

Nina Purewal:

Thank you. So this is a proof book, it’s, Let that shit go. It is got 100 tips on how to find more peace and happiness in your every day. It’s rooted in mindfulness. Although we don’t really talk about mindfulness till the end. So it goes through a very pragmatic approach on how to live just more peacefully. I also do corporate workshops. So I’ve worked with a lot of global companies, executives, full teams, full companies, on how to implement more happiness, and peace and mindfulness into their day to day. And yeah, just launched a 12 week master class. All of this can be found on my website, pureminds.ca. And I really appreciate your support. And I really enjoyed this conversation, Will.

 

Will Barron:

Perfect. Well, I’ll link to all of that in the show notes. And if now that we’ve talked about and I’ll dig up these studies, because I don’t know how well I communicated while I was trying to explain this. I’ll put them in the show notes for this episode as well over at salesma.org. Nina, I want to thank you for your time. Thank you for spending so much efforts and diving into this topics is incredibly important and I think it’s only going to get more important moving forward. So I thank you for your expertise and for joining us on The Salesman Podcast.

 

Nina Purewal:

Thank you so much Will. I really appreciate you having me.

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