Use “Content Prospecting” To Connect With More Potential Buyers

David Dulany is the CEO and founder of Tenbound, a research and advisory firm focused on sales development performance.

In today’s episode of The Salesman Podcast, David shares his lead generation strategy “content prospecting” and how it can help fill your pipeline.

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Featured on this episode:

Host - Will Barron
Founder of Salesman.org
Guest - David Dulany
Sales Development Program Building Specialist

Resources:

Transcript

Will Barron:

Coming up on today’s episode of The Salesman Podcast.

 

David Dulany:

As prospectors and sales development reps, we need to have something fresh in our messaging to be able to reach out to people. What I have seen work and be successful is actually, yes, the salespeople creating content based on their expertise and really coming at it from a point of view of trying to help the customer, which is the core of a good salesperson anyway.

 

Will Barron:

Hello Sales Nation, I’m Will Barron, host of The Salesman Podcast, the world’s most downloaded B2B sales show. If you haven’t already make sure to click subscribe, and on today’s episode, we have David Dulany. He is the founder over at Tenbound. You can find him over at tenbound.com. And on today’s episode, we’re getting into content prospecting. How to get deals done, how to get the sales process started using content that either you’re creating or perhaps you’re leveraging it from elsewhere. It’s an incredible way to build your personal brand and it stacks up over the months and the years, and it makes you an incredible salesperson, an incredibly effective salesperson. So, with all that said, let’s jump right in to the show.

 

What is Content Prospecting? · [01:07] 

 

Will Barron:

So in today’s show, I want to get into content prospecting. So we’ll start at the beginning. What the heck is content prospecting and how does it relate to both SDRs and that side of sales? Then perhaps we’ll get into the full stack salespeople as well.

 

“When you think about content prospecting, there’s two sides of the equation. One is, there’s a hunger for relevant content out there in the industry that can help people to get better at their jobs and give them something to bite down on if they’re doing self-education. So, there’s a huge hunger for content. And at the same time, as prospectors and sales development reps, we need to have something fresh in our messaging to be able to reach out to people.” – Dave Dulany · [01:28] 

 

David Dulany:

Yeah. It’s a very exciting topic. I’m glad that we can kind of expose it for the audience. So, when you think about content prospecting, there’s two sides of the equation. One is, there’s a hunger for relevant content out there in the industry, that can help people to get better at their jobs and give them something to bite down on, if they’re doing self-education, so there’s a huge hunger for content. And at the same time, as prospectors and sales development reps, we need to have something fresh in our messaging to be able to reach out to people. The old, “Hey, just take a look at my product or get on a call with me to listen to me talk about my service.” It’s tired and people are just ignoring it, so this gives you a fresh approach to go out and talk to people that you need to be talking to in your target market. So, it really serves both sides of that equation.

 

Should All Salespeople be Creating Content? · [02:25]

 

Will Barron:

This gets right to the crux of the matter here. Should salespeople be creating this content, or is this something that we work with a marketing team, perhaps a sales content marketing agency, external, whatever it is to create the content and sales people share it, or should it be unique and authoritative to that individual and almost be a thought leadership programme that salespeople should be going through.

 

David Dulany:

Yeah. I mean that’s the key point. So there’s a lot of egos involved because there’s people out there whose whole job is to create content marketing and create the posts and the podcasts and the different material that we think about when we think about content. But what I have seen work and be successful is actually yes, the salespeople creating content based on their expertise and really coming at it from a point of view of trying to help the customer, which is the core of a good salesperson anyways.

 

“When you think about content marketing, it’s becoming an expert in the pain points and the struggles of your target market and going out to people and talking with them about how they’re dealing with that. What’s working, what’s not. And then being very clear and transparent with them that you’re going to use this as potentially a podcast or a webinar or a blog post.” – David Dulany · [03:21] 

 

David Dulany:

So when you think about content marketing, it’s becoming an expert in the pain points and the struggles of your target market and going out to people and talking with them about how they’re dealing with that. What’s working, what’s not. And then being very clear and transparent with them that you’re going to use this as potentially a podcast or a webinar or a blog post. And as a salesperson, you’re having these conversations anyways, and you’re reaching out to people anyway. So this is just another tool in your toolbox to be able to forge those conversations. And you can work with the internal resources at your company, if you do have a marketer or an editor or content writer to get something out there.

 

Organic Virality: David’s Thoughts on How LinkedIn and Youtube Promote Relevant and Authoritative Content · [04:15]  

 

Will Barron:

So I see this anecdote, I don’t have any data on it. You may have data on this, David, or you may have a better kind of bigger anecdotal group to go off with your consulting clients and all the coaching and that that you do. But it seems to me that on LinkedIn, clearly, if you’re in B2B sales, probably where we’re spending a lot of time sharing content, commenting, that kind of thing. When a brand shares yet another webinar or a brand shares a quote card, gets minimal engagement. Nevermind. It doesn’t matter how big that brand is. It doesn’t seem to get that much engagement on LinkedIn, whereas an individual doing a pretty crappy iPhone front-facing video, they can get tens of thousands of views and almost go mini viral within their little niche within their industry, which is great. So do you see that this is something that LinkedIn, maybe not Facebook, but perhaps YouTube as well, promotes the individual who is an authority, the individual who’s being authentic over just a bland, corporate piece of social media or marketing on that front.

 

“As a salesperson, you’re talking to these people all day, you should really devote yourself to become an expert in their pain points and the industry and what’s going on and then be able to help them with at least what you’re hearing out there. So the corporate marketing team, maybe it doesn’t have the pulse that you do as a salesperson on exactly what’s going on in the marketplace and what could potentially help people that are consuming your content.” – David Dulany · [06:04] 

 

David Dulany:

Yeah, that’s a good question. I mean, there’s a lot of talk about how LinkedIn displays posts and how you can achieve organic virality on that’s a big word at 4:00 AM. So how you can get out there without paying LinkedIn. And a lot of it is those individuals that you see walking down the street, holding a camera up to their face and talking. It gets better virality than just a corporate marketing piece. And I think the key to having this be valuable and be successful is you have to start from a place that you really care about the industry and the customers that you’re serving, and you want to add value to their lives and try to help them out. I think that’s the key. So as a salesperson, you’re talking to these people all day, you should really devote yourself to become an expert in their pain points and the industry and what’s going on and then be able to help them with at least what you’re hearing out there.

 

David Dulany:

So the corporate marketing team, maybe it doesn’t have the pulse that you do as a salesperson on exactly what’s going on in the marketplace and what could potentially help people that are consuming your content. And the other thing, Will, is when you think about content prospecting, it doesn’t have to just be you writing blog posts and walking down the street with a video, taking a video of yourself. It can also be reaching out to people for interviews.

 

“One of the tools that you can use is reaching out and saying, “Hey, I just want to interview you for this post that I’m working on, or this podcast that I’m doing, or a webinar and get your thoughts on trends in the industry, what’s working and what’s not.” And, it’s not as much like, I just want to set a demo with you.” – David Dulany · [06:58] 

 

David Dulany:

So if you think about, you want to approach people in your prospecting anyways. So one of the tools that you can use is reaching out and saying, “Hey, I just want to interview you for this post that I’m working on, or this podcast that I’m doing, or a webinar and get your thoughts on trends in the industry, what’s working and what’s not. And, it’s not as much like, I just want to set a demo with you, but it’s more like, I want to number one, get your thoughts on what’s going on, and any tips that you have for people that might help. And number two, you know, be able to promote you, Mr. or Mrs. Guest, as a personal brand to get you out there,” because maybe that person doesn’t have any exposure on LinkedIn. And so you can… it’s a win-win across the board.

 

Will Barron:

So I’ve said this, and I’ve shared this on the podcast in the past, David, that if I was back in medical device sales, and I should have done it at the time, because I had these thoughts, but it wasn’t necessarily as, appropriate is the word coming to mind, to do this back when I was in medical device sales, but I would start a podcast interviewing endoscopic surgeons. And there’s only 20, 30 people that I could interview. And if those 20, 30 people in Yorkshire, who I was selling to, if I interviewed all of them and they all listened to the show, so I had an audience of 30 people, I would have crushed my quota every single year because I’d have been that centre of attention. So I’ve talked about that on the show in the past, but I loved selling these medical devices, had a few idiot sales managers that rubbed a little bit of the shine off the job itself.

 

Content Creation For Salespeople Who Don’t Want to Have a Long-term Career in Sales · [08:35]

 

Will Barron:

And it was a job. It was, as a slogan, a bit of a grind at times, but I loved the products, I loved engaging with the surgeons, I loved being in that environment. How does all this work, David, for someone who doesn’t particularly care about the product that they’re selling, who doesn’t really want to wake up 20 years from now and be an industry expert in the specific niche that they’re selling into. How do we sell these individuals that this is valuable to them? Or should these people just be in a different career or in a different job?

 

David Dulany:

Yeah, that is a great question. And my initial thought is that this probably wouldn’t be the best route to go. You should probably go back to just sending out canned emails, mindlessly cold calling, because one of the main sort of foundational success factors in this approach is you have to love what you’re doing and have some kind of passion toward the industry and the people that you’re interacting with. You know, if you’re just reaching out… I actually, I’ve seen both sides of this. If you’re reaching out and trying to set up interviews with people and get them to participate in your webinar and things like that, and you really don’t care about them, or what they’re doing, or their industry, and you’re just doing it to check a box, then it comes across as very sterile.

 

David Dulany:

And especially if the guest is being asked to do this a lot, it’s almost like they’re feeling used in some respect, and that’s not what we’re going for here. It should be really, the core focus of this is, as a salesperson. I want to improve my skills, learn more about the industry and genuinely help the people that are out there with tips, tricks, strategies. So that’s the core reason. And of course, I want to build my network, like your example with the medical professionals. I want to build my network, get to know people and expand my business. Otherwise we’re just kind of messing around and not doing anything that’s relevant to our business, but the core has to be that you have some passion for what you’re talking about and what you’re doing. Because they’re going to feel that in the approach, and your content is also going to suffer if you don’t really care about what you’re talking about.

 

“If you want to get into content production and get out there more in the industry, find something that you’re actually passionate about, whether it’s related to your business or not and just jump into that because that’ll energise you, give you passion, and maybe start a new career.” – David Dulany · [11:06] 

 

David Dulany:

So I think if that’s the case, maybe you should start… If you want to get into content production and get out there more in the industry, find something that you’re actually passionate about, whether it’s related to your business or not. And just jump into that because that’ll energise you, give you passion, and maybe start a new career.

 

The Perfect Blend Between Personality and Business in Content Prospecting · [11:55]  

 

Will Barron:

Yeah. That is a really good way of looking at it. And also, trying to engineer a way that you are not just another salesperson. So if you are… I’m making this up as I go along, but if I was selling medical devices and I also played a load of golf, for example, a lot of surgeons play golf. You could then perhaps wrap up some of your sales stories, your analogies, and almost create IP and such property or a brand on the fact that you’re the local rep, who is the expert golfer, who also does this and that. I feel like we need, do we need a way… What I’m asking here David is, do we need a way to not just pitch via content, but to differentiate ourselves as individuals via content, because it seems like that’s the way that we are more effective than just a corporate marketing team when we can throw our own personal brand into things.

 

“When you think about the personal brand, that’s something that you can build that goes throughout your career. It’s more about who you are and what value you bring. And you can carry that from company to company as you go through your career.” – David Dulany · [12:15] 

 

David Dulany:

Yeah. Yeah. There’s a lot there. I mean, when you think about the personal brand, that’s something that you can build that goes throughout your career. It’s more about who you are and what value you bring. And you can carry that from company to company as you go through your career. So, it’s another topic for another webinar, but that’s really important to bring your own personality into this and your own experience. That’s sort of company agnostic, because believe me, there’s no loyalty out there. You have to be loyal to your own personal brand and build that up. But to your point, I can think of a few examples. One is Richard Harris and Scott Leese, they were really into surfing, and they’re also great salespeople. And so they started a conference that was down in Costa Rica called Surf and Sales.

 

David Dulany:

So they combine their two passions and were able to make it into a business. And now they have a podcast called Surf and Sales where they’re bringing in top thought leaders, such as what you’re doing at salesman.org and interviewing them, building a relationship, and potentially expanding their network to new business opportunities. So I definitely see that synergy of personality and business adds a lot. And it brings an additional passion that the people can feel, both the consumers of the content and also the guests that you bring on.

 

Will Barron:

Definitely, definitely. Okay. So someone who is sold on this… And just a footnote on that point that you made there, David, of, for anyone who isn’t sold on doing this, who probably might not be in the best… they might be in the correct career of sales, but they might not be selling the right product. Think of it like you’re building your personal brand. So you’re building that IP that you can take with you from the job where you’re in right now, where in the current economic climate, you’re probably sensible to carry on doing what you’re doing and keep your job secure, right? So maybe you can reframe as I’m going to build my personal brand in this role, so I can leverage that into a better role in the future. That might be one way of selling the audience on this, if they hate the product that they’re selling right now, they’ve got no interest in their customers really, be selfish about it. And perhaps that’s one way to get started.

 

How to Start Content Prospecting · [14:40]

 

Will Barron:

With that said, what is the starting point for the people who are already sold on this? The people who are interested in this, who want to start doing content prospecting, what is… they want to do it right today. They’re listening to this in the morning on the way to the virtual office, which is the other side of the house right now. What’s the first thing they should be doing this afternoon to put this into practise?

 

David Dulany:

Yeah, absolutely. So first things first is doing sort of a gut check, are you really passionate about the industry and the people that you’re helping. Okay. We covered that. Let’s say we tick that box. We really do want to help people.

 

“What is the total pain in the neck that you can identify, because right there is going to be what you’re going to talk about on these blogs, interviews or podcasts, or webinars that you set up. You want to live in that pain point and give people genuine strategies and tactics that they can use to alleviate those pain points.” – David Dulany · [15:29] 

 

David Dulany:

Okay. So the next is your core audience, the people out there that you want to talk to on your prospect list in the industry, what are two or three of their core struggles? What are they struggling with on a daily basis? There’s probably two or three things that you can think of off the top of your head, that they just struggle with: their pain points. What is like a total pain in the neck that you can identify, because right there is going to be what you’re going to talk about on these blog interviews or podcasts or webinars that you set up. You want to live in that pain point and give people genuine strategies and tactics that they can use to alleviate those pain points. That’s the key. It’s all about the people and the industry that you’re interested in and that you’re calling into versus what you’re selling.

 

David Dulany:

Okay. So then the next thing is you got to have a process for producing the content and promoting it. And so, it’s not enough to just call people up, do interviews, do podcasts, do webinars, and then have like sort of a half-ass process in the backend. You’ve got to be able to at least take out a whiteboard and map out how you’re going to get the material from… first of all, get in front of the guest and have them agree to meet with you, interview them, get the material, edit it, and then post it and promote it.

 

“Create an ideal guest profile. So instead of an ideal customer profile or persona, create an ideal guest profile. So someone who is an expert and has a great track record in your field and they’re recognised, or they might not be recognised, but they have an amazing resume that you can see on LinkedIn.” – David Dulany · [17:05] 

 

David Dulany:

So there’s a lot of steps that are involved and it’s not going to happen by itself. So at first you’re going to be in charge of that. And then hopefully as you grow, you can get some help. So have a great process. And then the other couple of quick things is create an ideal guest profile. So instead of an ideal customer profile or persona, create an ideal guest profile. So someone who is an expert and has a great track record in your field and they’re recognised, or they might not be recognised, but they have an amazing resume that you can see on LinkedIn. And then someone who potentially has a big network and can help you with promotion. Because the more people that they know, the more that that can get out there and you can build it. And then someone who may potentially be able to make some introductions to you, to some sales contacts that you didn’t have before.

 

David Dulany:

And so, and then the last quick one is study the masters of this. Will is a master of interviewing people. He’s excellent. He’s had huge success with this process. And then you’ve got, there’s a lady named Terry Gross, who is… I believe she still operates. She’s an NPR interviewer who does a show called Fresh Air. And we’ll put a link in the comments, but she’s got all of her interviews up for like the last 20 years, amazing interviewer. And you can learn a lot from the way that she interviews people. So some quick tips, passion for the subject, get your core audience struggles and pain points, get them down, get a process in place, get your ideal guest profile, and then study the masters.

 

How to Balance Between Interviewing Experts in Your Field Versus Interviewing Thought Leaders with Massive Audiences · [18:45]

 

Will Barron:

How do we know the balance here? And I’m almost asking this for myself, David, because I don’t know the answer. How do we know the balance between interviewing people that are legit experts in their field, but they are an expert in the field, so they probably have zero audience because they’re soldiered in depth in the trenches versus… which probably creates the best content, versus interviewing people with a big audience. But they are full of shit most of the time.

 

Will Barron:

There’s a dichotomy here and people are in between the two, but the truest experts in the… people like yourself doing original research who are in the trenches, coaching people, you have a reasonable size audience, but it’s not of millions and millions of people. There’s very few people in the sales space with that kind of audience. And then the few that have that audience are assholes as… there’s people that come to mind that we won’t dive into, but how do we get the balance between the two here, especially if we’re going to start doing this this afternoon from starting at zero.

 

“I think those obscure, heads down in the trenches people that are really, really knowledgeable and have a lot of experience are not necessarily on LinkedIn. They’re actually in their operating doing the job every day and they don’t have a lot of time to be on LinkedIn writing posts and things like that.” – David Dulany · [19:53] 

 

David Dulany:

Yeah. That’s a great question. You’ve got to figure out that balance because I think those obscure, heads down in the trenches people that are really, really knowledgeable and have a lot of experience are not necessarily on LinkedIn. They’re actually in their operating doing the job every day and they don’t have a lot of time to be on LinkedIn writing posts and things like that. 

 

“Whenever you post something, a transcript or a blog, make sure that they can print it out, bring it back to their desk, and put it into action.” – David Dulany · [20:35] 

 

David Dulany:

So what I would suggest is going back to what are the main pain points and struggles of the audience that you’re trying to build, and really focusing there at first to put out content that can seriously help them. I got great advice when I first started this, that whenever you post something or a transcript for a blog, make sure that they can print it out, bring it back to their desk, and put it into action.

 

David Dulany:

And it’s something very, very valuable. So you can build that reputation. And then, kind of as you get going, you can sprinkle in the gurus and the people that have millions of followers within that mix. But personally, I would start with the really hardcore obscure experts and they don’t have as much of a reach, and they can’t help you promote the content as much, but you’re going to get some great content.

 

David Dulany:

The other thing, Will, really quickly like producer to producer is if you record a podcast or you do a webinar or get a blog, and it’s just not up to the editorial standards that you want to put out, and it’s not helpful enough to your audience… One of the things that I struggled with as a nice guy is going back and just saying, “Hey, we can’t use this. It’s just, there’s not enough here.” And that’s a very delicate conversation because you reached out to the person, they gave you their time, they gave you the best possible content that they could give you. You took it, you looked at it, and it just wasn’t valuable enough for your audience. So having that conversation is tough, but I think you got to have it because you got to put out good content.

 

How to Create an Effective Post-interview Communication Process · [22:10]  

 

Will Barron:

Well, I’ll add to that on… Regular listeners will know this because it’s almost like a bonus episode that’ll come out at some point. I interviewed Jordan Belfort of Wolf of Wall Street fame a little while back, and it was an absolute terrible interview. So, I have to take responsibility for it being a terrible interview. And we just didn’t get on, on a number of levels. So it never got published. But when I reached out to Jordan, because it’s polite to say, “It isn’t going to go live, sorry for essentially wasting your time. We’re not going to be doing this again.” And he was absolutely fine. He was professional about it, and that’s where it ended. And it was far better for me to go to him and explain that to him than it was to get an email a few weeks later where he’s demanding the episode and the details so he can share it with his audience and that side of things.

 

Will Barron:

So it’s maybe difficult for the interviewer to start that conversation. But if you’re dealing with professionals, I think they will appreciate the fact that you’ve been open and honest with them. And it’s… I’ve done it a bunch of times now. Jordan’s a prime example of it because it was a terrible interview, but… It was just 30 minutes of his argument, but it made total sense and he was professional and polite about it. So I don’t think that should be a worry. It might be a bit awkward, but it shouldn’t be a worry.

 

“One key process is the post-interview communication with the guests because the guests think that the day after you interview them, you’re going to be posting it across thousands of different channels and getting all these views and clicks. And a lot of times, you’ve got a lot of content. If you start doing this a lot, you’ve got a lot of content in the queue and you have to do a lot of editing. It just takes a long time. So sometimes the thing that you make doesn’t post for two or three months. And so it’s important to have that process of just being like, “Hey, this probably won’t go out for like 90 days,” or something like that.” – David Dulany · [23:40] 

 

David Dulany:

Yeah, exactly. And you bring up a good point that I… one of the things I mentioned is having a process in place, and I’ll be the first to admit I’m more of a creative person. I’ve worked for 20 years to try to build processes in because I know that I need them. And one key process is sort of the post-interview communication with the guests, because the guests think that the day after you interview them, you’re going to be posting it across thousands of different channels and getting all these views and clicks. And a lot of times, you’ve got a lot of content. If you start doing this a lot, you’ve got a lot of content in the queue and you have to do a lot of editing. It just takes a long time. So sometimes the thing that you make doesn’t post for two or three months. And so it’s important to have that process of just being like, “Hey, this probably won’t go out for like 90 days,” or something like that, so that they don’t send you mean emails and stuff like that.

 

Will Barron:

And I want to add one final thing, then I’m going to ask you if there’s anything we’ve missed here, David. But something that you brought to the show and did a lot of the hard work for me here, was coming up with a step-by-step process so that the audience can run through this and immediately have an actionable list, essentially. And we’ll include that in the show notes of this episode over at salesman.org, of essentially once you’ve got your passion, understand your core audience, come up with one to three core struggles or pain points that they have, and come up with a process to create content to alleviate some of those pain points the best you can. And then there’s a bunch of ancillary points between them as well. That’s what I always try and get out of these episodes, these podcast interviews.

 

Will Barron:

Your approach, you did all the hard work for me, but that’s always at the back of my mind when I’m having these conversations of pulling the pieces together, aligning the dots the best I can, and leaving the audience with something tangible at the end of it, because there’s so much content out there. Everyone is doing podcasts. I had to explain when I first started the Salesman Podcast, to a lot of people, what a podcast was. Now it’s ubiquitous, right? Everyone knows what it is. My dad listens to a canal boat podcast on his iPhone. So if my dad’s there, everyone’s there, right? Even my girlfriend, she’s a doctor. She’s never listened to any of this content. She’s now listening to a BBC podcast from here in Yorkshire, in the UK, that is all about COVID-19 and it’s being recorded and filmed in the hospital that she works at. So now she’s into podcasting and has seen the light.

 

“You can really separate yourself, differentiate yourself and your content by creating videos, audios, scripts, blogs, whatever it is that give people an actionable series of things to do once the content wraps up. Because I just see that as a massive gap in the content marketplace. There’s lots of opinions because opinions are quick, fast, and easy to share, but people giving strategic advice I think is lacking.” – Will Barron · [25:49] 

 

Will Barron:

So with all that said, you can really separate yourself, differentiate yourself in your content by creating videos, audios, scripts, blogs, whatever it is that give people an actionable series of things to do once the content wraps up. Because I just see that as a massive gap in the content marketplace. There’s lots of opinions because opinions are quick, fast, and easy to share, but people giving strategic advice I think is lacking. So that’s only… That’s my kind of input on this episode, David.

 

Content Prospecting is Primarily Built on Helping people · [26:17] 

 

Will Barron:

And is there anything that we’ve missed? Is there anything that we should add to that list for the audience so that they can jump into this this afternoon when they wrap up listening to the show?

 

David Dulany:

Yeah, I mean, well put. One thing that I would just add is just to make sure that we understand that it doesn’t just have to be you sitting there going, oh, I got to come up with some content and build my brand and put out videos and stuff like that. Even if you’re shy, if you’re introverted, you can still do this because you can reach out to those experts that are in your niche industry. I used to sell secure DNS for massive computer systems. And literally, I came into it knowing nothing about it, but over the course of a couple of years, I knew the key players, I knew the industry, and I could comfortably talk about it to some extent, not technically, but great place to start because… the DNS security podcast, boom, right there, you’ve got a built-in market. You have something to talk about when you’re reaching out to busy security professionals, and they’re the experts, you’re just interviewing them and honing your interview skills and becoming a good editor.

 

David Dulany:

So I just want to make it clear. You don’t have to do all this yourself. You don’t have to be the next person walking around with a video camera. This can be very focused on other people and helping to alleviate their pain points. And you’re going to make some great connections, you’re going to build your network, and you’re going to be more successful. So, that’s my soapbox.

 

Parting Thoughts · [28:46] 

 

Will Barron:

Yeah, I think you are dead right. And when I look on LinkedIn, and I see people that are producing content and it’s their own thoughts and opinions, if they’ve not been in the industry for 10, 20 years, if they’re not doing incredible, or what we call it over at salesman.org, remarkable things. I always think, why are they creating content? They should be using all that energy, that gusto, that motivation to get in front of people like yourself and pull the insights from you. I’m doing it right here, right? I’m not above or beyond any of this. I’ve got you on, David, to literally do what we’ve just described. So, I think that’s the starting point for most people, extroverted, introverted, or anything in between. And with that mate, tell us a little bit about Tenbound or where we can find out more about you.

 

David Dulany:

Yeah, absolutely. So Tenbound is just over at T-E-N-B-O-U-N-D.com, tenbound.com. And we’re an ultra niche research and advisory firm that focuses on prospecting, objection handling, cold calling, all the things that go into sales development. And one thing I’m really excited about is we’re going virtual this year. We have to. We put on live conferences each year and due to the crisis, we’re going virtual. And so we’ve got one coming up in June of 2020, and one coming up in August of 2020, where we’re trying to recreate the conference experience online. So hopefully everybody can join us over there at the virtual conference this year. 

 

Will Barron:

Good stuff. Well I’ll link to that and everything else that we’ve talked about in the show notes of this episode, over at salesman.org. And with that, David, I want to thank you for your time. The hustle of getting on the show at 4:00 AM. I appreciate that. The audience does as well, and your insights and all this. Thanks very much for joining us on the show.

 

David Dulany:

Thank you.

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